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Consider:

class X:

    def some_method(self):
        print("X.some_method called")

class Y:

    def some_method(self):
        print("Y.some_method called")

class Foo(X,Y):

    def some_method(self):

        super().some_method()
        # plus some Foo-specific work to be done here

foo_instance = Foo()
foo_instance.some_method()

Output:

X.some_method called

Switching the class declaration of Foo to instead be:

class Foo(Y,X):

Alters the output to:

Y.some_method called

If I want both ancestor methods to be called I could alter Foo's implementation as:

def some_method(self):

    X().some_method()
    Y().some_method()
    # plus some Foo-specific work to be done here

This leads to my question. Is there any uber secret way to cause Python to invoke the method on all ancestors without me doing so explicitly like the code, such as (I'm making up the all_ancestors keyword here - does such a thing actually exist?):

def some_method(self):

    all_ancestors().some_method()
    # plus some Foo-specific work to be done here

with an expected output of:

X.some_method called
Y.some_method called
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-1 This is a duplicate for all practical purposes of your previous question. –  Marcin Sep 5 '12 at 4:34
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marked as duplicate by Marcin, Bakuriu, Aaron Hall, plannapus, Donal Fellows Mar 20 at 9:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, there is no secret way to do that. As I mentioned in your other question, the usual way to do this is not to call all ancestor methods from the single descendant class. Instead, each class should use super to call just one ancestor method, namely the next one up the inheritance chain. If every class in the tree does this (except the topmost base class), then all methods will get called in order. In other words, Foo should use super(), which will call X's method; and then X should also use super(), which will call Y's method.

To make this work right, it is usually best to have a single topmost class in the inheritance tree. In your example this would be a class that is the base of both X and Y. You need such a class to serve as a final stop to the sequence of super calling; this base class should not call super. If you just keep calling super everywhere, eventually it will try to call up to the base object class, and then fail because object doesn't provide the method you're trying to call.

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This is a very contrived example (as you can see). Having said that, in this case the inheritance tree is not Foo -> X -> Y. It's Foo -> X,Y. But your answer that there's no uber secret way to invoke the method on both parents answers my question, thanks! –  Matthew Lund Sep 5 '12 at 2:35
    
@MatthewLund: Although Foo inherits from both, the inheritance order (called the "method resolution order") is still Foo -> X -> Y because X is inherited before Y. (You can see this by printing Foo.__mro__.) There always has to be a linear resolution order in order to decide which class's implementation actually gets called. –  BrenBarn Sep 5 '12 at 2:37
1  
see marcins post in your other thread about the use of super and how to properly use it ... it is good advice... –  Joran Beasley Sep 5 '12 at 4:14
    
Actually, the topmost class can call super, but you need an exception handler to catch the resulting exception. –  Marcin Sep 5 '12 at 4:34
    
Thanks Bren, didn't realize that the linear resolution order came into play. –  Matthew Lund Sep 5 '12 at 7:09
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If you can provide X & Y with a common base class or mix-in, this should work:

class ISomeMethod:
    def some_method(self):
        pass

class X(ISomeMethod):
    def some_method(self):
        print("X.some_method called")
        super(X, self).some_method()

class Y(ISomeMethod):
    def some_method(self):
        print("Y.some_method called")
        super(Y, self).some_method()

some_method should then be called in the order which you declare the base classes in Foo.

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