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What is faster?

the Merge statement

    MERGE INTO table_name 
     USING dual
     ON (row_id = 'some_id')
    WHEN MATCHED THEN
     UPDATE SET col_name = 'some_val'
    WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
     INSERT (row_id, col_name)
     VALUES ('some_id', 'some_val')

or

querying a select statement then using an update or insert statement.

    SELECT * FROM table_name where row_id = 'some_id'

if rowCount == 0

    INSERT INTO table_name (row_id,col_name) VALUES ('some_id','some_val')

else

    UPDATE table_name SET col_name='some_val' WHERE row_id='some_id'
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The rule of thumb is, if you can do it in one SQL, it'll generally perform better than doing it in multiple SQL statements.

I'd go with the MERGE if it does the job.

More importantly, however, there is a difference in how the two approaches will work in a high-concurrency situation. Each SQL statement (in the database's default serialization mode) will only see data that was committed at the start of the statement.

If you do a SELECT, followed by an INSERT, it is possible that another session will have committed an insert of the row just after you ran the insert, which means that your code may insert a row when it should have updated it.

The MERGE doesn't suffer from this problem.

By the way, why are you using a column named rowid?

Also - another suggestion: you can avoid repeating data in your statement, e.g.:

MERGE INTO table
 USING (SELECT 'some_id' AS newid,
               'some_val' AS newval
        FROM dual)
 ON (rowid = newid)
WHEN MATCHED THEN
 UPDATE SET colname = newval
WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN
 INSERT (rowid, colname)
 VALUES (newid, newval)
share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking the same but how about the process on the oracle server? –  DRTauli Sep 5 '12 at 3:38
1  
what about the process? –  Jeffrey Kemp Sep 5 '12 at 3:41
    
rowid is just the rows pk. –  DRTauli Sep 5 '12 at 3:42
    
yes, I gathered that - but I was talking about the choice of column name, which conflicts with oracle's ROWID pseudocolumn. –  Jeffrey Kemp Sep 5 '12 at 3:44
    
oh.. i forgot about that.. lol.. –  DRTauli Sep 5 '12 at 3:45

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