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I am writing this code. Here dt is input into the function, as well as someint. The column Exp is a T-SQL date column, which comes as a DateTime through Linq.

return (from a in dataContext.TableOfA
       where a.name == "Test" &&
       a.Exp.Value.AddDays(Convert.ToDouble(Someint)) >= new DateTimeOffset(dt)
       select a).First();

In C#, you can add a double as a day to a date time. Meaning you can add 1.5 days. In T-SQL you can only add 1 day, then 12 hours. You must add an int for each part. So when Linq translates AddDays to T-SQL, it converts my number of days to milliseconds, and adds those. This allows it to give all the precision the double gives C#.

Here's the rub. When this gets to SQL, I get the error:

The datepart millisecond is not supported by date function dateadd for data type date

Basically you can't add milliseconds to a date. Well no kidding. But how do I get something that translates here? I want to add int days to a date. Is the only want to do this to add the negative of them to the other guy I am comparing against? What if I wanted to compare to columns while adding to one?

Update 1

Keith wrote, A command like datepart(millisecond, 10000, myDate) has been supported in T-SQL since at least SQL Server 2000. This error suggests that whatever database you are using does not support the millisecond date part, which seems strange to me.

Please note I am using SQL Server 2008. It is not supported on the DATE data type. It is supported on datetime.

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A command like datepart(millisecond, 10000, myDate) has been supported in T-SQL since at least SQL Server 2000. This error suggests that whatever database you are using does not support the millisecond date part, which seems strange to me. –  Keith Aug 4 '09 at 14:05
    
It is not supported on the DATE data type. It is supported on datetime. –  Anthony D Aug 4 '09 at 14:08
    
That makes more sense. Well if you have control over the DB design, the simple solution would be to change this column from a DATE to a DATETIME then. Obviously if you're asking this question though, this is not something you have control over? –  Keith Aug 4 '09 at 14:14

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I just changed the column back to a DateTime.

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If you are using the Entity Framework, use the System.Data.Objects.EntityFunctions as below:

c.CMT_TS > System.Data.Objects.EntityFunctions.AddDays(e.Call.CALL_TS, 1)
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You can move the call to AddDays from the SQL part to the .NET part:

a.Exp.Value >= new DateTimeOffset(dt).AddDays(-Convert.ToDouble(Someint))
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It seems like this scenario is mostly fixed in .NET 4.5.

However, if you write:

var activeProducts = from p in db.Products where DateTime.Now() <= p.EndDate.Date.AddDays(7) select p;

You will get the same error message as described in the OP.

But, if you write:

var activeProducts = from p in db.Products where DateTime.Now() <= p.EndDate.AddDays(7) select p;

Then you can enter the land of milk and honey. Note that I did not call .Date on the database's DateTime representation. This seems to be an edge case missing test coverage by the LINQ 2 SQL framework in 4.5

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Create a new DateTime object and use AddDays method after that:

new DateTime(t.Key.Year,t.Key.Month,T.Key.Day).AddDays(xx)
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Have you considered writing your own user-defined function that basically takes in an int (for number of days) and date, returns the results of a dateadd()? Then pull that into the LINQ class in your project. Then, instead of calling .AddDate(), call your UDF - this will allow you to keep everything in your LINQ query without having to manually piece together a SQLCommand.

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You can also use SqlMethods.DateDiffDay method, if you're trying to compare two dates

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May be good idea if you would first change your Sql query to Linq and process linq query instead.

Just add ToList() or limit record

return (from a in dataContext.TableOfA.ToList()
   where a.name == "Test" &&
   a.Exp.Value.AddDays(Convert.ToDouble(Someint)) >= new DateTimeOffset(dt)
   select a).First();

So once you have all your stuff in Linq then you can process more effectivly I think.

Cheers

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