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how can i find out how many objects are created of a class in C#

Is it possible to get number of instances which is active(created and not yet destroyed) for selected class?

For example

public class MyClass
{
}

    c1 = new MyClass();
    c2 = new MyClass();

    count = GetActiveInstances(typeof(MyClass))

should return 2. If GC destroy any of these classes then 1 or 0.

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marked as duplicate by AVD, Rune FS, Jodrell, Andras Zoltan, Donal Fellows Sep 5 '12 at 8:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
define "active", what do you mean by destroyed. –  Jodrell Sep 5 '12 at 7:39
2  
boring people would declare a static int variable increasing on construction and decrease on deletion. –  Najzero Sep 5 '12 at 7:40
    
No, there is nothing within C# or .NET that supports this. Also, I struggle to see a practical application for it? Every 'active', i.e. referenced object is reachable by your own code, so you can create your own counting mechanism. –  ColinE Sep 5 '12 at 7:40
    
Practical usage would be for performance counter and memory leaks tracking using PostSharp+SmartInspect. –  Tomas Sep 5 '12 at 7:42
    
looks like a duplicate question to me, and so many duplicate answers. –  Jodrell Sep 5 '12 at 7:49

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can holds global static counter in your program.
This is a simple thread safe solution:

class MyClass
{
    static int counter = 0;

    public MyClass()
    {
        Interlocked.Increment(ref counter);
    }

    public ~MyClass()
    {
        Interlocked.Decrement(ref counter);
    }
}

also take a look at the following similar question - Count number of objects of class type within class method

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2  
+1 for the use of lock –  Yannick Blondeau Sep 5 '12 at 7:47
    
@YannickBlondeau: lock should always target a private field though. If you are going to do it, then do it right. –  Jon Sep 5 '12 at 7:50
4  
No. Never put a lock in a finaliser. You don't want the finaliser thread blocking for any reason. Use Interlocked.Increment and Interlocked.Decrement if you must do something like this from a finaliser. –  Jon Hanna Sep 5 '12 at 7:53
    
Thanks @JonHanna –  Dor Cohen Sep 5 '12 at 8:00
    
Thanks @Jon, I didn't know that... –  Yannick Blondeau Sep 5 '12 at 8:02

Only if you implement a counting mechanism inside the constructor (increment) and finalizer (decrement). But even that will not account for instances which are really inactive (noone has any reference to them) but have not been collected yet.

Moreover, adding a finalizer to a class -- no matter how trivial -- will adversely affect performance, which is an argument against doing so.

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this :

public class MyClass
{
    private static int instances = 0;

    public MyClass()
    {
        instances++;
    }

    ~MyClass()
    {
        instances--;
    }


    public static int GetActiveInstances()
    {
        return instances;
    }

}

use :

     MyClass c1 = new MyClass();
     MyClass c2 = new MyClass();

     int count = MyClass.GetActiveInstances();
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I don't know of a built in mechanism, but you can always incrase a private static variable in constructor.

public class MyClass
{
   static int instances = 0;
    public MyClass(){
       instances++;
    }
    ~MyClass(){
      instances--;
    }
}

Haven't tried but should work.

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Try this one:

public class MyClass
{
    public static int activeCount = 0;

    public MyClass()
    {
        activeCount++;
    }

    ~MyClass()
    {
        activeCount--;
    }
}


//In the main
 MyClass testClass1 = new MyClass();
 MyClass testClass2 = new MyClass();

 Console.WriteLine(MyClass.activeCount);
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Such thing is not possible but you can do soemthing like

Note : classinstance can be also int value just to maintain count.

class mytype 
{
  public static List<mytype> classinstance = new List<mytype>();
  public mytype()
  {
    classinstance.Add(this);
  }

  public removeclass(mytype t)
  {
    classinstance.Remove(t);
    t=null;
  }

  public int ActiveCount 
  {
    get { classinstance.Count; }
  }
}
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 public class MyClass
    {
public  static int countinstance  =0;
MyClass(){ countinstance  ++;}
 ~ MyClass() {countinstance  --; }
    }

simple and easy get instance active by countinstance

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public class MyClass{
     static int count;
     static object _lock = new object();
     public MyClass(){
         lock(_lock){
             count++;
         }
     }
     ~MyClass(){
         lock(_lock){
             count--;
         }
     }

}
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protected void finalize()? –  Jon Sep 5 '12 at 7:41
1  
This is a C# question, not Java. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 5 '12 at 7:43
    
see also stackoverflow.com/questions/934619/… –  Andras Zoltan Sep 5 '12 at 7:45
    
daniel - my bad. Is C# now –  Esben Skov Pedersen Sep 5 '12 at 8:01

You can try it by making a static variable for count in class and increment it in constructor and decrement in destructor.May this helps you.

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