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Does the parameter String args[] for accepting commandline arguments in main() have an impact if no commandline arguments are provided.

Does it:

  1. Create a new object of String?
  2. Is any memory allocated to it?

What does Java do when it encounters String args[]?

Update: Wanted to ask a related a Question: If no cmdline args are provided, Will String args[] be empty or null?

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1  
Yes, you will be wasting 16 bytes which is costs about 0.00003 cents of memory ;) –  Peter Lawrey Sep 5 '12 at 7:59
    
Well, Piotr Gwiazda says only a String [] is created (not String object), so will it still consume 16 bytes? –  Jaison Varghese Sep 5 '12 at 9:39
    
A String[] is an object and an empty one will be about 16 bytes. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 5 '12 at 9:45
    
That was helpful. How can I calculate that myself? –  Jaison Varghese Sep 5 '12 at 17:32
    
See my answer below. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 5 '12 at 17:36
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A String[] is an object and an empty one will be about 16 bytes.

That was helpful. How can I calculate that myself?

public static long memoryUsed() {
    final Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
    return rt.totalMemory() - rt.freeMemory();
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    long before = memoryUsed();
    String[] arr = { };
    long after = memoryUsed();
    if(before == after) throw new AssertionError("you need to turn off the TLAB with -XX:-UseTLAB");
    System.out.printf("The String[] used %,d bytes of memory%n", (after - before));
}

prints

The String[] used 16 bytes of memory

Note: this print how much memory was used to create an object. This can be more than the amount retained if temporary objects are created.

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How to turn off TLAB? Sorry I feel like a beginner seeing all this –  Jaison Varghese Sep 5 '12 at 18:10
    
Add -XX:-UseTLAB to the command line. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 5 '12 at 19:39
    
I get the following output >javac -XX:-UseTLab TestC.java javac: invalid flag: -XX:-UseTLab. I even tried this option with java command. I also searched a lot on the internet for usage of this option. But I'm not being able to switch off the TLabs. Thanks for the continued interest in my question –  Jaison Varghese Sep 6 '12 at 14:56
1  
Java is case sensitive. ;) This is a runtime option in any case javac TestC.java ; java -cp . -XX:-UseTLAB TestC –  Peter Lawrey Sep 6 '12 at 15:00
    
Thanks. it worked: For any who are stuck, this was the command: java -XX:-UseTLAB TestC (after compiling) –  Jaison Varghese Sep 6 '12 at 15:03
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It depends. If you pass some command-line arguments it creates String objects. String args[] is only a reference to the table object. If no arguments are provided args would be empty. What is more in args you can have only parameters. In C/C++ e.g. you would have also e.g. application name. Java is different. Read more about command-line arguments here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/environment/cmdLineArgs.html

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Can you tell me what is the table object? –  Jaison Varghese Sep 5 '12 at 9:42
    
Tables are objects in Java. Notice that you can call some methods on them (e.g. length) what would be impossible if they would be some primitives as in C. –  Adam Sznajder Sep 5 '12 at 9:57
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This code creates one String[] reference on the stack and one String[] object (an empty array) on the heap. No String objects are created.

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If the program is called without command line arguments, args[] is empty, so no String is created. You will have an empty array then.

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