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I have the following code:

set< vector<int> > set_of_things;
vector<int> triplet(3);

//set_of_things.push_back(stuff) - adding a number of things to the set

How do I now iterate through the set and print all elements?

The set is a collection of triplets so the output should look like:

1 2 3 
3 4 5
4 5 6
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4  
What have you tried and where did you run into problems? –  juanchopanza Sep 5 '12 at 8:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You use iterators:

for ( std::set<vector<int> >::iterator it = set_of_things.begin() ; 
      it != set_of_things.end() ; 
      it++ )
{
   // *it is a `vector<int>`
}

In C++11 you can use auto instead of std::set<vector<int> >::iterator.

If you're not modifying the iterator, you should use a const_iterator instead.

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so *it[0], *it[1], *it[2] should be the elements in a set? This does not work for me –  roshanvid Sep 5 '12 at 8:19
    
@c0smikdebris I didn't say that. *it is the element (of type vector) –  Luchian Grigore Sep 5 '12 at 8:20
2  
@c0smikdebris (*it)[0]. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 5 '12 at 8:20
    
@c0smikdebris Of course nobody actually frees you of understanding such fundamental things like pointer/iterator dereferenciation and operator precedence. –  Christian Rau Sep 5 '12 at 8:47
    
Ahh, my bad. That was really silly of me. –  roshanvid Sep 5 '12 at 10:03

This is straight-forward with the new range-based for loops that were introduced in C++11:

for (auto const & v : set_of_things)
{
    for (auto it = v.cbegin(), e = v.cend(); it != e; ++it)
    {
        if (it != v.cbegin()) std::cout << " ";
        std::cout << *it;
    }
    std::cout << "\n";
}

If you don't mind a trailing space:

for (auto const & v : set_of_things)
{
    for (auto const & x : v)
    {
        std::cout << *it << " ";
    }
    std::cout << "\n";
}

Or use the pretty printer:

#include <prettyprint.hpp>
#include <iostream>

std::cout << set_of_things << std::endl;

If you have an older compiler, you will have to spell both iterations out in terms of iterators.

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3  
+1, but perhaps the C++11 requirement should be explicit? –  Jon Sep 5 '12 at 8:19
3  
@Jon: Or perhaps the "legacy-C++" requirement should be explicit in the question? :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 8:19
2  
Point taken, but when the goal is to provide correct, practical and educational solutions then IMHO the onus is on the more knowledgeable party. :-) –  Jon Sep 5 '12 at 8:21

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