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I have a class Booking

public class Booking
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }

        public string From { get; set; }

        public string To { get; set; }
    }

I create a List bookings with the help of linq and I want some mechanism with which I want to autogenerate the 'Id' property to increment by 1.

I.e. if the List bookings contains 10 Booking object then the first object's Id = 1, second Id = 2 and so one...

any suggestion

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what do you mean by "I create a List bookings with the help of linq" ? –  Bogdan_Ch Aug 4 '09 at 14:26
    
Your best bet is to let the database handle those unique ID's by specifying a "INT IDENTITY" column in your table to hold the bookings. –  marc_s Aug 4 '09 at 14:46
    
i dont have any database –  Miral Aug 4 '09 at 15:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following will give you a list of NEW bookings with the index projected into your ID property. You could probably do something similar to this to update the existing list with the index...

var myBookings = myExistingListOfTen.Select((b, index) => new Booking
                 {
                     Id = index + 1, 
                     From=b.From, 
                     To=b.To
                 });
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This way you lose the reference and you do unnessecary object instantiation. –  Dykam Aug 4 '09 at 14:20
    
Yes, you do. OP asked for neither of those requirements though... –  Scott Ivey Aug 4 '09 at 14:21
    
For me, this is the best answer so far. –  jpbochi Aug 4 '09 at 14:24
    
True. But there are better solutions. –  Dykam Aug 4 '09 at 14:25
    
Yes, i agree there are too. There are times when something like this can be used, but those cases are pretty small compared to when it probably shouldn't be used. –  Scott Ivey Aug 4 '09 at 14:30

Surely if it is a property on the object you want the value to be consistent from invocation to invocation. Booking 'A' shouldn't have a different id depending on where it exists in the list. If you are simply wanting the index of the item in the list, don't store it as a property of the item, but derive it from its position in the list.

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1  
voted for this . all other suggestion do not take into account that bookings can be not only added but also removed from the collection. though, question is not clear enough. –  Bogdan_Ch Aug 4 '09 at 14:25

Not nice, but it will work. The trick is to use the overload providing the index of the item.

list = list.Select((item, index) => { item.Id = index; return item; });

This will update the existing bookings, but you could also select a new instance with the id set and avoid this ugly return at the cost of duplicating the bookings and losing the references as Scott Ivey suggests. And of course you have to add one if you want one-based ids.

I find it a bit strange to generate ids this way, too, but it might be a acceptable solution if you get a list of new bookings without id and want to generate them. In this case the ids should obviously not start with zero or one, but the largest already assigned id plus one.

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+1 - good answer Daniel. –  Scott Ivey Aug 4 '09 at 14:26

To be able to do the following:

bookings.ForEach((booking, index) => booking.Id = index + 1);

You need to place to following snippet somewhere in a static class:

public static IEnumerable<T> ForEach<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Action<T, int> action)
    {
    	int index = 0;
        foreach (T element in source) {
    		action(element, index++);
    	}
    }
    return source;
}

Ofcourse the following will work too:

int index = 0;
foreach (var booking in bookings) {
    booking.Id = ++index;
}
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public class Booking
{
    private static int BookingCount = 1;

    public Booking()
    {
       Id = BookingCount++;
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }

    public string From { get; set; }

    public string To { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is bad practice, ins't it? What is the questioner wants two collections? –  Dykam Aug 4 '09 at 14:22
    
this will create a global counter... and also, i will suggest using Interlocked for thread safety –  Bogdan_Ch Aug 4 '09 at 14:23

Although I agree with @tvanfosson (+1), if you really want to keep an ID in Booking I think that this should be setted upon the construction of Booking. You could have something like a Booking Context where each context would create bookings with serial IDs:

    public class Booking
    {
        protected Booking() { }
        public int Id { get; set; }

        public string From { get; set; }

        public string To { get; set; }
    }

    public class BookingContextFactory
    {
        private int count;

        public BookingContextFactory() : this(0) { }
        public BookingContextFactory(int startValue) 
        {
            count = startValue;
        }

        public Booking CreateBooking(string from, string to)
        {
            return new InternalBooking { Id = count++, From = from, To = to };
        }

        private class InternalBooking : Booking
        {
            public InternalBooking() : base() { }
        }
    }
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Not sure if I understand your question right, but you could always

ID = bookings.Select(b=>b.ID).Max()+1;

Not sure if that's such a good idea (it won't be uber performant).

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The performance would be disastrous :P. O(n^2) –  Dykam Aug 4 '09 at 14:23

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