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I've got some maintenance work to do on some WPF controls, which is something I'm not really familiar with, and I am struggling with some fundamentals in WPF.

I have the following code, which I understand is referred to as "code-behind":

Class MainWindow
    Private _myStrings As New List(Of String)({"one", "two", "three", "four", "five"})
    Public Property myStrings As List(Of String)
        Get
            Return _myStrings
        End Get
        Set(value As List(Of String))
            _myStrings = value
        End Set
    End Property
End Class

I then have this WPF stuff, which defines a really ugly ComboBox.

<Window x:Class="MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <ComboBox Margin="0,10,0,0"
                  x:Name="cboItem" 
                  TabIndex="1"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Question: All I want to know is how do I correctly create references in the XAML to display the myStrings List in the cboItem ComboBox? Once I know that, I can get around to understanding databinding concepts in detail, but right now, I need someone to explain really basic things for me like "How do I tell XAML where to look for data?"

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ComboBox has a property called ItemsSource that can be set to either a static list of strings, or more commonly, can be bound to some list of objects.

WPF objects look for their bindings in their DataContext. This is a property of every WPF framework element, and will "cascade" down, so setting the DataContext of the Window means that every control on that window will also inherit the same DataContext. However, they do not have to use the same context. Every control can have its own context set simply by setting its DataContext property.

You have defined your list of strings in the window itself (in the code behind). This is not really usual. A more common method used in WPF is to define a ViewModel class that contains all the data your view needs, and then set that as the DataContext. This is what the MVVM pattern is all about.

However, going with your example, there is nothing stopping you from setting your Window's DataContext to the Window itself:

<Window x:Class="MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525"
    DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}">
    <Grid>
        <ComboBox Margin="0,10,0,0"
                  x:Name="cboItem" 
                  TabIndex="1"
                  ItemsSource="{Binding myStrings}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

The DataContext line tells WPF which object to look at for its bindings, and the ItemsSource line tells the combo which property to use on the context for its list of strings.

EDIT: To set the DataContext on the combo you could do:

<Window x:Class="MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <ComboBox Margin="0,10,0,0"
                  x:Name="cboItem" 
                  TabIndex="1"
                  DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource FindAncestor, AncestorType={x:Type Window}}"
                  ItemsSource="{Binding myStrings}"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>
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Thanks. How would I set the DataContext for the ComboBox itself, though? If I try and transplant the code I'm writing back into the maintenance project, I'd imagine that setting the DataContext at a higher level will break all of the other code on that control. –  Frosty840 Sep 5 '12 at 9:41
    
Have updated answer, but I would try and use whatever context everything else is using if possible. Hacking stuff into the code behind isn't great. –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 5 '12 at 9:46
    
Yeah, well, the maintenance project itself has been so thoroughly abused at this point that it won't even register ''' comments as documentation. They just sit there as comments. I'm so scared of doing anything to it that I can't ever see it getting fixed to any real extent. I've got another legacy WPF project in MVVM and I can see the advantages, but that's not in a much better state. It doesn't use dependency properties, it hacks everything using all sorts of weird workarounds. It's all rather past the point of repair, basically. I do genuinely appreciate the advice, though. –  Frosty840 Sep 5 '12 at 10:03
    
I feel your pain. :-( –  GazTheDestroyer Sep 5 '12 at 10:08
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