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I have a class..

class myClass
{
public:
    myClass(int time);
}

Then I need to have this class within struct.

class TopClass
{
 public:
  typedef struct{
    int myint;
    myClass myclass;
  }tStruct;

  tStruct sStruct1;
  tStruct sStruct2;

}

How can I do it? How can I call constructors for myClass? Is only way to use class instead of struct?

My constructor

TopClass::TopClass():               
        sStruct1({32, myClass(100)}),
        sStruct2({52, myClass(1000)})
{

}

But I am getting error:

extended initializer lists only available with -std=c++0x or -std=gnu++0x

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2  
What's the problem with it? –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 5 '12 at 9:25
1  
It's not really clear what you're looking for. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 5 '12 at 9:25
    
What is the actual problem? Are you getting any errors? –  juanchopanza Sep 5 '12 at 9:29
    
ok guys, my post was edited... –  Meloun Sep 5 '12 at 10:18
    
Don't use typedef struct {...} name; in C++. Declare struct name {...};. –  japreiss Sep 18 '12 at 15:57
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can add constructor to struct: http://ideone.com/ifBw2

class TopClass
{
 public:
  struct tStruct {
    tStruct(int time, int k = 0): myint(k), myclass(time) {}
    int myint;
    myClass myclass;
  };

  TopClass(int t): sStruct1(t), sStruct2(t) {}

  tStruct sStruct1;
  tStruct sStruct2;

};

Edit

As for new question - you have to use new standard (-std=c++0x) to do that this way. In old standard you have to add explicit ctor to initialize member variables. struct in C++ is nearly exactly the same as class - you can add ctors, member functions, static functions. The only difference is default privacy - public for struct and private for class:

class A {
public: 
  int b;
};

is exactly the same as

struct A {
  int b; 
};
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Thanks! Maybe was not obvious what I am looking for, but your answer is exactly what I want! –  Meloun Sep 5 '12 at 10:45
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Actually, Pawel Zubrycki’s answer is all right.

But I want to know why you have to do in this way that you have to import another class constructor inside TopClass.

I mean that the code should follow the rule of high cohesion and low coupling. In software construction we’d rather prefer the composition (an important design mode) to a class defination in it. Something like the following code.

class B{
public:
    B(int y){b = y;}
private:
    int b;
};

class A {
public:
    A(int x):b(x){...};
private:
    B b;
};

From the code we can maximize class B and obviously reduce the complexity of class A. A & B can change all by themselves.

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How can I do it? How can I call constructors for myClass?

Your struct will need a constructor, since it has a member with no default constructor. In order to have a constructor, it will also need its own name, not just a typedef alias.

struct tStruct {
    // If you want a default constructor:
    tStruct() : myClass(42) {}

    // If you want to specify the time:
    tStruct(int time) : myClass(time) {}

    int myint;
    myClass myclass;
};

Is only way to use class instead of struct?

class and struct mean exactly the same thing (apart from the minor distinction of having different default access specifiers). Anything you can do with one, you can do with the other.

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