Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
/*--------------------utilities.h-------------------------------------*/

#ifndef UTILITIES_H
#define UTILITIES_H

template<class T> int compare(const T&,const T&);

#include<utilities.cpp>
#endif

/*--------------------utilities.cpp-------------------------------------*/

template<class T> int compare(const T &v1 , const T &v2)
{
    if (v1 < v2) return -1;
    if (v2 < v1) return 1;
    return 0;
}

/*--------------------main.cpp------------------------------------------*/

#include<iostream>
#include<utilities.h>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    cout << compare(1,2) << endl;

    return 0;
}

The code above is an example from a book. However, it gives errors when I compile the three files:

utilities.h:6:24: fatal error: utilities.cpp: No such file or directory
compilation terminated.
main.cpp:2:22: fatal error: utilities.h: No such file or directory
compilation terminated.

I don't know why I get "No such file or directory"!

share|improve this question
1  
$path variables? include? –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 5 '12 at 9:26
    
You need to put the template definition in the header file? stackoverflow.com/questions/495021/… –  madu Sep 5 '12 at 9:28
    
@madu no. .cpp file includes in .hpp. all is okay here. –  ForEveR Sep 5 '12 at 9:29
    
The error lies in the fact that the compiler fails to find the files to include, but to help more you should give compiler name and command invoked for compilation. –  CharlesB Sep 5 '12 at 9:29
1  
How are you compiling them? (which compiler and which command are you using to compile) –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 5 '12 at 9:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Problem 1

When you write:

#include <utilities.h>

The compiler looks for utilities.h in it's default include paths or ones that are specified explicitly (e.g. in g++ with -I).

You can write:

#include "utilities.h"

to make it first look at a path relative to the source file.

Problem 2

You have included utilities.cpp in the header file (also with the same problem as above). This is not recommended, but not strictly wrong. However, in that case, the contents of that file already get compiled and included in the main.o, so you actually don't need to compile and link the two object files, but only main.cpp suffices.

The recommended approach to writing templates is to write everything in the header file (I know, it's not nice):

/*--------------------utilities.h-------------------------------------*/

#ifndef UTILITIES_H
#define UTILITIES_H

template<class T>
static inline int compare(const T &v1, const T &v2);
{
    if (v1 < v2) return -1;
    if (v2 < v1) return 1;
    return 0;
}

#endif

/*--------------------main.cpp------------------------------------------*/

#include <iostream>
#include "utilities.h"

using namespace std;

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    cout << compare(1,2) << endl;

    return 0;
}

You simply compile main.cpp.

share|improve this answer
    
approach 2 should never compile on most compilers. –  ForEveR Sep 5 '12 at 9:47
    
@forever, yeah, I thought I saw somewhere they did that. –  Shahbaz Sep 5 '12 at 9:49
    
@Shahbaz The recommended approach to writing templates is to put the implementation in a separate file, which is included from the header, as he has done. The only difference would be that this file should probably not end with .cpp, since most people would automatically compile anything ending with .cpp. –  James Kanze Sep 5 '12 at 11:14
    
@JamesKanze, so what extension would you give to that other file? –  Shahbaz Sep 5 '12 at 11:31
    
@Shahbaz In my own code, I use .cc and .hh for the normal sources and headers, and .tcc for the template implementations. For someone using .cpp and .hpp, I would suggest something like .tpp, but it really doesn't matter, as long as you're consistent (and that it isn't something which would be recognized as a file to compile: not .cpp, .cxx or .cc.) –  James Kanze Sep 5 '12 at 12:38

The book isn't giving you the contents of one file, it's giving you the contents of several. When the listing says

/*--------------------utilities.cpp-------------------------------------*/

the authors mean "Put the following code in the file `utilities.cpp". It looks like you haven't got that file. Do that, and it will all compile.

share|improve this answer
    
If you look closely at the error messages, you will see that the OP has at least utilities.h and main.cpp, hence I believe it's not the case. –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 5 '12 at 9:32
    
That error message tells us that OP doesn't have utilities.cpp. –  Hbcdev Sep 5 '12 at 9:33
    
yes, but it says utilities.h:6:24: which means that the error happens inside utilities.h, so the OP didn't put the whole example into one file as you suggested. –  SingerOfTheFall Sep 5 '12 at 9:34
    
Updated answer to be specific to the file the OP is actually missing... –  Hbcdev Sep 5 '12 at 9:35
    
@Hbcdev The error message tells us that compiler couldn't find the files, not that they don't exist. The most likely reason why the compiler couldn't find them is because the OP told it not to look in the current directory, by using the <...> form of #include, rather than the "..." form. –  James Kanze Sep 5 '12 at 9:36

Whether it was in a book or not, there's an error in the code. It should be

#include "utilities.cpp"

and

#include "utilities.h"

Normally, when you use the <...> form of the include, the compiler will not look for the file in the current directory. (You can usually tell it to do so, with an option along the lines of /I. or -I., but using the correct form of the include is preferable.)

share|improve this answer

Change

#include<utilities.cpp>

to

#include "utilities.cpp"

and

#include<utilities.h>

to

#include "utilities.h"

Inclusion with <> is meant for "system" headers. I'd also suggest that you rename utilities.cpp to utilities.ipp, to differentiates source files that are included from those that are compiled directly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.