Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I think the title covers the issue, but to elucidate:

The pandas python package has a DataFrame data type for holding table data in python. It also has a convenient interface to the hdf5 file format, so pandas DataFrames (and other data) can be saved using a simple dict-like interface (assuming you have pytables installed)

import pandas 
import numpy
d = pandas.HDFStore('data.h5')
d['testdata'] = pandas.DataFrame({'N': numpy.random.randn(5)})
d.close()

So far so good. However, if I then try to load that same hdf5 into R I see things aren't so simple:

> library(hdf5)
> hdf5load('data.h5')
NULL
> testdata
$block0_values
         [,1]      [,2]      [,3]       [,4]      [,5]
[1,] 1.498147 0.8843877 -1.081656 0.08717049 -1.302641
attr(,"CLASS")
[1] "ARRAY"
attr(,"VERSION")
[1] "2.3"
attr(,"TITLE")
[1] ""
attr(,"FLAVOR")
[1] "numpy"

$block0_items
[1] "N"
attr(,"CLASS")
[1] "ARRAY"
attr(,"VERSION")
[1] "2.3"
attr(,"TITLE")
[1] ""
attr(,"FLAVOR")
[1] "numpy"
attr(,"kind")
[1] "string"
attr(,"name")
[1] "N."

$axis1
[1] 0 1 2 3 4
attr(,"CLASS")
[1] "ARRAY"
attr(,"VERSION")
[1] "2.3"
attr(,"TITLE")
[1] ""
attr(,"FLAVOR")
[1] "numpy"
attr(,"kind")
[1] "integer"
attr(,"name")
[1] "N."

$axis0
[1] "N"
attr(,"CLASS")
[1] "ARRAY"
attr(,"VERSION")
[1] "2.3"
attr(,"TITLE")
[1] ""
attr(,"FLAVOR")
[1] "numpy"
attr(,"kind")
[1] "string"
attr(,"name")
[1] "N."

attr(,"TITLE")
[1] ""
attr(,"CLASS")
[1] "GROUP"
attr(,"VERSION")
[1] "1.0"
attr(,"ndim")
[1] 2
attr(,"axis0_variety")
[1] "regular"
attr(,"axis1_variety")
[1] "regular"
attr(,"nblocks")
[1] 1
attr(,"block0_items_variety")
[1] "regular"
attr(,"pandas_type")
[1] "frame"

Which brings me to my question: ideally I would be able to save back and forth from R to pandas. I can obviously write a wrapper from pandas to R (I think... though I think if I use a pandas MultiIndex that might become trickier), but I don't think I can easily then use that data back in pandas. Any suggestions?

Bonus: what I really want to do is use the data.table package in R with a pandas dataframe (the keying approach is suspiciously similar in both packages). Any help on that one greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
What is the problem exactly? Doesn't testdata$block0_values return the values you saved from the panda? –  Paul Hiemstra Sep 5 '12 at 9:50
    
The problem is then being able to reopen again in pandas (see the later part of my question). I can convert to an R data.frame (or data.table) do some manipulations, but then I can't save back to pandas easily (without another, probably more complicated, wrapper). –  Griffith Rees Sep 5 '12 at 11:37
    
I think what you're asking about would be very useful. For now, would it be acceptable to use something like this: pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/r_interface.html or perhaps even use the R bridge support in recent ipython? (ipython.org/ipython-doc/stable/config/extensions/rmagic.html) –  Dav Clark Nov 9 '12 at 5:03

4 Answers 4

If you are still looking at this, take a look at this post on google groups. It shows how to exchange data between pandas/R via HDF5.

https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/pydata/0LR72GN9p6w

share|improve this answer
1  
Amazing, the first time I read this I didn't think it would go anywhere, but I just came across this again and it looks like progress has been made, particularly since it's now in the docs: pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/…. Will test and give you credit if it works ;) –  Griffith Rees Feb 19 '13 at 17:19
    
Sadly I couldn't quite get it to work, and R's hdf5 loading seems to take ages. I'm now using the new fread function in data.table: r.789695.n4.nabble.com/… –  Griffith Rees Mar 5 '13 at 3:09

It would make sense to dropdown to pytables and store/get your data there.

Ultimately a DataFrame is a dict of Series which is what an HDF5 Table is. There are limitations on the translation due to incompatible dtypes but for numerical data it should be straight forward.

The way pandas stores its HDF5 is viewed more like a binary blob. It has to support all the nuances of a DataFrame which HDF5 does support cleanly.

https://github.com/dalejung/trtools/blob/master/trtools/io/pytables.py

Has some that kind of pandas/hdf5 munging code.

share|improve this answer
    
So you recommend writing a custom compatibility layer in pytables between pandas and R? I guess I need to figure out which has the simpler HDF5 format (R or pandas) and make that my basic datatype, then provide a converter on either end whenever I read or write. –  Griffith Rees Sep 9 '12 at 17:27
    
Yes. You could conceivably write an R adapter to read/write pandas hdf semantically. But it seems easier to create a semantic HDF and have simple wrappers on both ends. –  dale Sep 10 '12 at 13:24

How to write a dataframe in HDF5 so it can be read in R is now in the Pandas documentation: http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/dev/io.html#external-compatibility

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I already linked there in my comment on the first answer. Sadly it's not a very efficient library in my own personal tests (as compared with data.table's fread), but perhaps I should give it another try. Thanks for the interest. –  Griffith Rees Jun 24 '13 at 18:37

You could use csv files as the common data format. Both R and python pandas can easily work with that. You might lose some precision, but if this is a problem depends on your specific problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes of course, but that would mean I then lose the speed and convenience of the hdf5 format. R is super slow at parsing big text files (which is why I often use STATA's dta format for big data in R). I'd rather not write code to write to dta in python (there is a reader available in the statsmodels package). –  Griffith Rees Sep 5 '12 at 11:36
    
Ironically enough that's now what I do because of data.table's super fast fread function for csv's. Sorry for the previous down vote. –  Griffith Rees Jun 24 '13 at 18:39
1  
@GriffithRees You could mark my answer as the correct one to atone for the downvote ;) –  Paul Hiemstra Jun 24 '13 at 20:13
    
@Paul But, your answer is not the correct one. CSV simply isn't a practical solution, nor a good one architecturally, nor a creative one. –  Will Sep 10 '13 at 7:01
2  
@GriffithRees, seems like there is still no progress and I have been bugged with this issue forever. I've started to working on my own dedicated binary data format for data frames that is compatible with R, Python's Pandas, C#/F#'s Deedle and Scala's Saddle.I will post a link if I ever finish my project. –  uday Apr 10 at 22:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.