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I'm trying to understand why the following code doesn't compile.

class X
{
public:
    template< typename T >
    void set( T & val )
    {
    }
};

int main( int c, char *v[] )
{
    X x;

    x.set( new int( 99 ) );        // 15
}

On my solaris compiler I get the following error.

"x.cpp", line 15: Error: Could not find a match for X::set<X::T>(int*) needed in main(int, char**).

I can't work out why the compiler woudln't take the reference of a pointer to an int and pass the type "T" as "int *"

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It can, but that's a temp ;)

class X
{
public:
    template< typename T >
    void set( T const & val )  // add const here
    {
    }
};

and you can't bind it to a non-const reference.

Same reason why this would work:

class X
{
public:
    template< typename T >
    void set( T & val )
    {
    }
};
int main( int c, char *v[] )
{
    X x;
    int * y = new int( 99 );
    x.set( y );        // 15
}

here, y is no longer a temporary.

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Thanks. I see now. :) –  ScaryAardvark Sep 5 '12 at 9:47

You can not bind a temporary to a non-const reference.

If you need to preserve that method's signature, you need to create a variable, and pass it to that method :

class X
{
public:
    template< typename T >
    void set( T & val )
    {
    }
};

int main( int c, char *v[] )
{
    X x;

    int * p = new int( 99 );
    x.set( p );        // 15
}

If you can change method's signature, pass the parameter by either const reference, or by value.

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The result of the new expression is an rvalue, so it cannot bind to a non-const reference.

Declare your template as void set(T val) instead to pass the pointer by value.

share|improve this answer
    
or const reference. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 5 '12 at 9:45
    
I actually suggest a const reference in this case, since you don't know what T can be. If it's a huge structure, you definitely don't want to pass by value. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 5 '12 at 9:46

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