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I have the following text file that i need to compare values from each line, namely items 2-4 against items 5-7. I'm stuck with bash/awk/sed on this one.

Sample data:

[hartford tmp]$ cat flist
a1 1 2 3 x y z
b1 3 2 1 z y x
c1 1 2 3 1 2 3
d1 4 5 6 6 5 4
e1 a b c a b c
f1 x y z x y z

It works with the following script but its just unbearably slow probably because all of the echo's.

[hartford tmp]$ cat pdelta.sh
#!/bin/bash

cat flist |while read rec; do
    f1="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $1 }')"
    f2="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $2 }')"
    f3="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $3 }')"
    f4="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $4 }')"
    f5="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $5 }')"
    f6="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $6 }')"
    f7="$(echo $rec | awk '{ print $7 }')"

    if [[ "x${f2} x${f3} x${f4}" != "x${f5} x${f6} x${f7}" ]]; then
            echo "$f1 DOES NOT MATCH"
    fi
done

When run, the output is exactly what I'm looking for but it's too slow when dealing with a file that's 50k+ lines long.

[hartford]$ ./pdelta.sh
a1 DOES NOT MATCH
b1 DOES NOT MATCH
d1 DOES NOT MATCH

What is a more efficient way to accomplish this?

Thank you in advance.

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Just for completeness, note also that set $rec would assign the first field to $1, the second to $2, etc. –  tripleee Sep 5 '12 at 14:08
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use awk to output all the matching id's:

awk '{ if ($2 == $5 && $3 == $6 && $4 == $7) { print $1 } }' < flist
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Perfect. Thank you. –  user1117603 Sep 5 '12 at 10:44
3  
Or $2 == $5 && $3 == $6 && $4 == $7 { print $1 }. –  Thor Sep 5 '12 at 10:45
    
Or $2$3$4 == $5$6$7 { print $1 } (Slightly less robust but I believe satisfies the problem constraints.) –  William Pursell Sep 5 '12 at 16:27
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You can use read to assign the variables:

$ while read f1 f2 f3 f4 f5 f6 f7; do stuff; done <flist
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A few fixes:

  1. Don't cat a single file into the pipe; just redirect standard input for the loop.
  2. read can split each line into the appropriate variables.
  3. Since you are using the bash [[...]] construct, you don't need to use the old trick of prefixing a possibly empty string with a single character. Just compare corresponding values directly.

So your loop reduces to

while read f1 f2 f3 f4 f5 f6 f7; do
    if [[ $f2 != $f5 || $f3 != $f6 || $f4 != $f7 ]]; then
        echo "$f1 DOES NOT MATCH"
    fi
done < flist

You can also use an array to reduce it even further

while read -a f; do
    if [[ ${f[@]:1:3} != ${f[@]:4:3} ]]; then
        echo "${f[0]} DOES NOT MATCH"
    fi
done < flist

The ${f[@]:x:y} notation expands to y elements starting at index x.

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Using perl:

perl -lane 'print $F[0] if @F[1..3] ne @F[4..6]' input_file
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Are you sure? perl -e '@v=(0,1,2,1); print @v[0,1] eq @v[2,3]' –  choroba Sep 5 '12 at 10:32
1  
You do not need the split, -a alread takes care of that: perl -lane 'print $F[0] if @F[1..3] ne @F[4..6]'. –  Thor Sep 5 '12 at 10:49
1  
There is more than one way to do it (in Perl). –  user647772 Sep 5 '12 at 12:24
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Python solution:

import sys

for line in sys.stdin:
    f1, f2, f3, f4, f5, f6, f7 = line.split()
    if not (f2, f3, f4) == (f5, f6, f7):
        print f1, "does not match"

Usage:

$ python f.py < flist
a1 does not match
b1 does not match
d1 does not match
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