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Perfectly valid HTML is good, not only because it's better for browsers, but because failure to pass validation may be the sign that there's something else wrong with the code. Therefore, I try my best to output perfectly valid and conforming to the standards (X)HTML. Today, while checking my pages with the validator, I found the following problem:

Line 84, Column 162: reference to non-existent ID "is_special"

...in the following context:

<tr>
    <td>
        <label for="is_special">Show in Special Offers:</label>
    </td>
    <td>
        <input type="radio" id="is_special_1" name="is_special" value="1"  />
        <label for="is_special_1">Yes</label>
        <input type="radio" id="is_special_0" name="is_special"
            value="0" checked="checked" />
        <label for="is_special_0">No</label>
    </td>
    <td>
    </td>
</tr>

The code that causes this fallacy is following:

protected function wrap_html_edit ($_html)
{
    $name = $this->name;
    $eh_label = escape_html ($this->label);
    if (isset ($this->validation_error))
        $eh_validation = '<div class="error">' .
            escape_html ($this->validation_error) . '</div>';
    else
        $eh_validation = '';
    return "<tr><td><label for=\"$name\">$eh_label:</label></td>" .
           "<td>$_html</td><td>$eh_validation</td></tr>";
}

In essence, this method takes HTML for a form control and embeds it in the table properly. The method belongs to the parent class to all controls and the actual HTML is generated by a protected method of the child class. However, wrap_html_edit() expects the child class method to return only a single form input element. This is simple to fix in one of the following ways, each of them having their own problems:

  1. Refactor everything. Problems: Time. Effort. Money.
  2. Override the wrap_html_edit() in the child class (some of them already do, although for more sensible reasons) and copy the code there, only changing the last statement. Problems: Severe case of code duplication.
  3. Add a member variable to the child class containing an ID for labels to point to. When it's null, label is not created. Problems: One more member variable that noone else needs.
  4. Since only one of the control classes has this problem, query the current class with get_class() and if it matches, don't create the label. Problems: Bad, bad code smell. What if class name changes? Or if the problem control in question will be inherited?
  5. Give one of the radio buttons "is_special" for ID. Problems: When user clicks on the label, one of the radio buttons will be selected. This clearly isn't what the user expects.
  6. Wrap radio buttons in some kind of invisible another control. Problems: What invisible control? <fieldset /> will require some CSS to be invisible. I'm not sure if a label can point to anything that isn't a form control. If it can, <div /> will actually be a perfect solution.

All of these solutions have their drawbacks. And while number five, if it's workable, is actually very fitting in this particular scenario, it still rises the following hypothetical question:


When the only way for your pages to become fully standards-compliant is to write some ugly code (or refactor everything), would you do it? Or would you leave the improper HTML be and favor clean code?

share|improve this question
3  
I think you've set up a false choice here. There's no reason valid HTML can not be generated by clean code. It's just that your code isn't it. 100% validation is a nice goal and all, but it's not always a reality. –  Andrew Barber Sep 5 '12 at 10:23
1  
Always go for compliance, then you can also be sure that no odd rednering/behaviour will/may manifest on various browsers. –  Brian Sep 5 '12 at 10:26
1  
I think the 'invalid' part of this code is that there is a <label> there at all, and that appears to be an artifact of how the generation code works; it's not taking into account the possibility of a 'label' (and validation message location) that is not also a <label>. Yes; refactoring the code at this point is probably not worth it. So my strict answer: Go with the 'invalid' HTML. –  Andrew Barber Sep 5 '12 at 11:02
1  
@Septagram I understand that you're not asking what html should be generated but because you want to have valid html I think my comment won't be off-topic. You must not have anything that has no use (well, this is general rule and not just for html) so if you don't need attribute simply don't generate. Let's assume that you've strongly decided to follow this rule. For this maybe you have to add extra conditions and so on in generation logic. If you generate huge form this may cause performance issues. Does it worth to have perfectly valid html in this situation? Probably, no. –  Leri Sep 5 '12 at 13:15
1  
Conclusion, IMO, code readability is the most important and you should keep it as readable as possible unless you have security, performance or some other issue that's visible and/or potential harmful to your users. –  Leri Sep 5 '12 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

It's a matter of practicality. I always prefer good code (HTML), but if there is a situation where that's not possible, or not reasonably possible within the constraints (like time), and the consequences of having "bad" code, if any, are small, then it might make sense to ignore the issue, at least for the time being. Maybe you can come back to it later and address it.

share|improve this answer

Labels are for form input elements. In this case, your first label wasn't referencing any form input element. I converted the label to a H4 tag. You can change it to anything you want to:

protected function wrap_html_edit ($_html)
{
    $name = $this->name;
    $eh_label = escape_html ($this->label);
    if (isset ($this->validation_error))
        $eh_validation = '<div class="error">' .
            escape_html ($this->validation_error) . '</div>';
    else
        $eh_validation = '';
    return "<tr><td><h4>$eh_label:</h4></td>" .
           "<td>$_html</td><td>$eh_validation</td></tr>";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Labels are intended to manage focus. When the user clicks a label, the respective form control gets the focus and starts receiving user input from the keyboard. Most child classes return one form control, and labels work well for those. Replacing labels with headers destroys the feature for the sake of valid HTML. –  Septagram Sep 5 '12 at 11:08

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