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Please could someone tell me why mktime is giving an error inside a class??

<?php

$time_Stamp = mktime(6,30,0);

echo strftime("%H:%M",$time_Stamp);

?>

reports 6:30

<?php

    class Test_Time{

        private $time_Stamp = mktime(6,30,0);

    }

    ?>

reports Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '(', expecting ',' or ';' in C:\Program Files (x86)\Ampps\www\sandbox\general\mktime.php on line 5

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you dont echo things inside a class, you create a function inside the class that can echo/return the value and to refer to the time stamp you use $this->time_stamp –  Breezer Sep 5 '12 at 10:30
    
@Breezer - oh yes sorry that just got left there in a quick a dirty test. not worried about. remove the erroneous echo I still get a parse error. –  codepuppy Sep 5 '12 at 10:35
    
there's some good answers below check them out ;) –  Breezer Sep 5 '12 at 10:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

According to the PHP docs, one can initialize properties in classes with the following restriction:

"This declaration may include an initialization, but this initialization must be a constant value--that is, it must be able to be evaluated at compile time and must not depend on run-time information in order to be evaluated."

Try this

<?php

class Test_Time{

    private $time_Stamp; 
   function __construct()
   {
        $this->time_Stamp = mktime(6,30,0);

         echo strftime("%H:%M",$this->time_Stamp);
   }
}
?>
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1  
You missed the semi-colon after private $time_stamp –  Matt Humphrey Sep 5 '12 at 10:39
    
Thanks Matt Humphrey –  Tarun Sep 5 '12 at 10:42
    
@fluty OMG I didn't know that - OK that's been added as a massive note in my folder. I have previously set statics etc with default values but of course they have always been constants up to now. Nearly given myself a coronary this morning trying to incorporate a test routine to a class and getting this error. I think that that essential gem got omitted from the lynda tutorial. Have to go back and review that again. Can't thank you enough. –  codepuppy Sep 5 '12 at 10:48
    
@codepuppy Statics are the exception :) –  Fluffeh Sep 5 '12 at 10:58
    
@Fluffeh Hang on just tried using mktime as part of an instance and a class variable declaration got parse error on both. Could you suggest how it could be incorporated into a static? Thx –  codepuppy Sep 5 '12 at 11:05

You cannot evaluate expressions to determine the default values of class members. Put mktime in the constructor instead:

class Foo {
    private $bar;
    public function __construct() {
        $this->bar = mktime(6, 30, 0);
    }
}
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Thank you for your help –  codepuppy Sep 5 '12 at 10:54

You are directly echoing in a class, do it in method or a constructer instead

<?php

class Test_Time{

   function __construct(){

    $time_Stamp = mktime(6,30,0);

    echo strftime("%H:%M",$time_Stamp);
    }

}

?>
share|improve this answer
    
there's no reason to create an entire class for that simple cause, you'll probably want to save the stamp inside a variable for use inside other functions inside the class that's kind of the hole purpose of classes inheritance and what not –  Breezer Sep 5 '12 at 10:33
    
@Breezer may be there are other codes as well in his class and he is just sharing the code that causes the problem. –  WatsMyName Sep 5 '12 at 10:36
1  
i think its quite obvious that the questionnaire is a beginner and just wants some guidelines on how OOP works, and imo we should be exemplary and show how, when and what is preferred and mandatory in oop –  Breezer Sep 5 '12 at 10:41

You can't execute code directly inside a class. It has to be inside a function which is called:

<?php
    class Test_Time
    {
        private $time_Stamp;
        function showTime()
        {
            $this->time_stamp=mktime(6,30,0);
            echo strftime("%H:%M",$this->time_Stamp);
        }
    }

    $var=new Test_Time();
    $var->showTime();

?>

This could be a __construct() function, but at some point the class must be instanciated.

The reason for this is that a class isn't actually anything unless a variable is defined as an object of that class. Until then, it is just a framework waiting be be used.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help. –  codepuppy Sep 5 '12 at 10:56
<?php
class Test_Time{

    private $time_Stamp;

    function __construct(){
        $this->time_Stamp = mktime(6, 30, 0);
    }

    function printTime(){
        echo strftime("%H:%M", $this->time_Stamp);
    }
}

//example usage
$test = new Test_Time();
$test->printTime();
?>
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help. –  codepuppy Sep 5 '12 at 10:57

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