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I've to write a thread-safe library that uses a POSIX semaphore (used as a mutex with initial value = 1) for sync. I found some problems to correctly manage async signals. I've an application that links against this static library and the application (multi-threaded) calls library's functions. Access to some internals structures are controlled by a posix semaphore (it's internal to the library):

void library_func1(lib_handler *h)
{
   sem_wait(sem);
   /* do some stuff with global data */
   sem_post(sem);
}

void library_func2(lib_handler *h)
{
   sem_wait(sem);
   /* do some stuff with global data */
   sem_post(sem);
}

void library_close(lib_handler *h)
{
   ...
}

What append if an async signal, let's say SIGINT, is raised when one thread is locking the semaphore? If i relaunch the application i'll have a deadlock because the semaphore exists and it's value is 0. There is a function library_close that could release the semaphore when the async signal is raised but which is the best way to do and check this (I think that that function would be signal-safe only if followed by exit)? In multi-threaded application usually is a good practice having a single thread manager for all signals: this thread should be in the library or is ok to launch it in the application?

Thank you all.

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2 Answers 2

Linux futexes had the same problem. It is not fully solvable, but what you could do is write the pid of the process locking the semaphore somewhere in the same shared memory region. If another process tries to lock the semaphore and it is taking too long (for some value of 'too long'), it finds out what process has the semaphore locked by reading the pid from the shared memory. If that process no longer exists, you know you are in a deadlock (and you should probably just die since the library's internal data may be in an inconsistent state).

There's still a small race with this as the process taking the lock may die just after locking but before writing its pid. AFAIK there's no way to avoid this using semaphores. (It might work if you have a lock implementation where the pid is written to the lock variable atomically on aquire, but you would probably need to write this yourself.)

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The state of a static library doesn't carry over between different runs of the app and isn't shared by other apps using it. it's part of the state of the application that's using it. So your semaphore won't be in a wonky state.

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The semaphore is shared between applications. –  MirkoBanchi Sep 6 '12 at 8:42
    
How? are you using some type of interprocess communication scheme? –  insomniac2846 Sep 7 '12 at 1:27
    
A POSIX semaphore is accessible through for example /dev/shm so is shared among processes. –  MirkoBanchi Sep 11 '12 at 12:27

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