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Common std::cin usage

int X;
cin >> X;

The main disadvantage of this is that X cannot be const. It can easily introduce bugs; and I am looking for some trick to be able to create a const value, and write to it just once.

The naive solution

// Naive
int X_temp;
cin >> X_temp;
const int X = X_temp;

You could obviously improve it by changing X to const&; still, the original variable can be modified.

I'm looking for a short and clever solution of how to do this. I am sure I am not the only one who will benefit from a good answer to this question.

// EDIT: I'd like the solution to be easily extensible to the other types (let's say, all PODs, std::string and movable-copyable classes with trivial constructor) (if it doesn't make sense, please let me know in comments).

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1  
Make the first two lines a function returning int :) const int X = read_cin(); –  dasblinkenlight Sep 5 '12 at 10:43
1  
Changing const int to const int& won't improve anything. Second one is almost exactly the same as const int * const so you will be copying sizeof(int*) and in const int you will be copying sizeof(int), so probably exactly the same amount of data. Using reference to int has no sense - you probably shouldn't use reference to any of POD-s. –  Pawel Zubrycki Sep 5 '12 at 10:54
3  
I personally like the "naive solution" you put. The value you read in from the user is manifestly NOT a constant, then you are explicity copying it's value into another value which you promise won't change by marking it const. It's slightly ugly but seems to exactly fit what's happening. –  jcoder Sep 5 '12 at 11:02
3  
Your "naive" solution is how it should be done. Nobody benefits from a huge bombastic class interface for performing such a simple, mundane task. If you find yourself writing long, complicated functions merely to set a variable, that's a certain sign telling that something has gone terribly wrong in the program design. –  Lundin Sep 5 '12 at 11:03
2  
@BartekBanachewicz "This requires a function for every type I'd like to read." Make it a read_cin<int>() then :) –  dasblinkenlight Sep 5 '12 at 11:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I'd probably opt for returning an optional, since the streaming could fail. To test if it did (in case you want to assign another value), use get_value_or(default), as shown in the example.

template<class T, class Stream>
boost::optional<T> stream_get(Stream& s){
  T x;
  if(s >> x)
    return std::move(x); // automatic move doesn't happen since
                         // return type is different from T
  return boost::none;
}

Live example.

To further ensure that the user gets no wall-of-overloads presented when T is not input-streamable, you can write a trait class that checks if stream >> T_lvalue is valid and static_assert if it's not:

namespace detail{
template<class T, class Stream>
struct is_input_streamable_test{
  template<class U>
  static auto f(U* u, Stream* s = 0) -> decltype((*s >> *u), int());
  template<class>
  static void f(...);

  static constexpr bool value = !std::is_void<decltype(f<T>(0))>::value;
};

template<class T, class Stream>
struct is_input_streamable
  : std::integral_constant<bool, is_input_streamable_test<T, Stream>::value>
{
};

template<class T, class Stream>
bool do_stream(T& v, Stream& s){ return s >> v; }
} // detail::

template<class T, class Stream>
boost::optional<T> stream_get(Stream& s){
  using iis = detail::is_input_streamable<T, Stream>;
  static_assert(iis::value, "T must support 'stream >> value_of_T'");
  T x;
  if(detail::do_stream(x, s))
    return std::move(x); // automatic move doesn't happen since
                         // return type is different from T
  return boost::none;
}

Live example.

I'm using a detail::do_stream function, since otherwise s >> x would still be parsed inside get_stream and you'd still get the wall-of-overloads that we wanted to avoid when the static_assert fires. Delegating this operation to a different function makes this work.

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2  
I’d claim that this is the only acceptable solution. But well, I’m weird. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 5 '12 at 11:48
3  
@KonradRudolph: That's a good way to define weird, just as much as the post is a great example of overkill :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 14:29
    
@Kerrek Structuring your code flow so that you have const objects? I don’t consider that in the least bit overkill. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 5 '12 at 14:37
2  
@KonradRudolph: What do you do with an optional const?! "Here's a constant... maybe"? –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 15:15
5  
@Xeo: It was meant somewhat tongue-in-cheek. I do appreciate the finesse of the solution. I was just amused at how big a solution the deceptively simple desire to initialize X had precipitated :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 19:26

You could make use of lambdas for such cases:

   const int x = []() -> int {
                     int t;
                     std::cin >> t;
                     return t;
                 }();

(Note the extra () at the end).

Instead of writing a separate functions, this has the advantage of not having to jump around in your source file, when reading the code.

Edit: Since in the comments it was stated that this goes against the DRY rule, you could take advantage of auto and 5.1.2:4 to reduce type repetition:

5.1.2:4 states:

[...] If a lambda-expression does not include a trailing-return-type, it is as if the trailing-return-type denotes the following type:

  • if the compound-statement is of the form

    { attribute-specifier-seq(opt) return expression ; }

    the type of the returned expression after lvalue-to-rvalue conversion (4.1), array-to-pointer conversion (4.2), and function-to-pointer conversion (4.3);

  • otherwise, void.

So we could alter the code to look like this:

   const auto x = [] {
                     int t;
                     std::cin >> t;
                     return t;
                  }();

I can't decide if that is better though, since the type is now "hidden" within the lambda body...

Edit 2: In the comments it was pointed out, that just removing the type name where it is possible, does not result in a "DRY-correct" code. Also the trailing-return-type deduction in this case is currently actually an extension of MSVC++ as well as g++ and not (yet) standard.

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Hm, can you skip the first set of () just after the []? –  Bartek Banachewicz Sep 5 '12 at 10:55
1  
@Bartek: Not if you want to provide a trailing return type. –  Xeo Sep 5 '12 at 10:56
1  
@BartekBanachewicz As for the DRY: You could use auto, but that'd only save you one repetition. –  lx. Sep 5 '12 at 11:16
2  
@lx. it's in the grammar in 5.1.2:1; lambda-declarator is optional, but if included it must contain a parameter-declaration-clause before the optional trailing-return-type. The semantics of an omitted lambda-declarator or an omitted trailing-return-type are defined in 5.1.2:4. –  ecatmur Sep 5 '12 at 11:53
2  
The real spirit of DRY is to refactor the pattern into a function such that you end up with e.g. const auto i = extract<int>(std::cin);, not that you make the pattern shorter. –  Luc Danton Sep 5 '12 at 19:10

A slight tweak to lx.'s lambda solution:

const int x = [](int t){ return iss >> t, t; }({});

Significantly less DRY violation; can be eliminated entirely by changing const int x to const auto x:

const auto x = [](int t){ return iss >> t, t; }({});

One further improvement; you can convert the copy into a move, since otherwise the comma operator suppresses the optimisation in 12.8:31 (Move constructor suppressed by comma operator):

const auto x = [](int t){ return iss >> t, std::move(t); }({});

Note that this is still potentially less efficient than lx.'s lambda, as that can benefit from NRVO whereas this still has to use a move constructor. On the other hand an optimising compiler should be able to optimise out a non-side-effect-bearing move.

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I really like your last example –  Bartek Banachewicz Sep 6 '12 at 12:09

You can call a function to return the result and initialize in the same statement:

template<typename T>
const T in_get (istream &in = std::cin) {
    T x;
    if (!(in >> x)) throw "Invalid input";
    return x;
}

const int X = in_get<int>();
const string str = in_get<string>();

fstream fin("myinput.in",fstream::in);
const int Y = in_get<int>(fin);

Example: http://ideone.com/kFBpT

If you have C++11, then you can specify the type only once if you use the auto&& keyword.

auto&& X = in_get<int>();
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1  
Needs more error checking! –  jrok Sep 5 '12 at 10:44
    
@KerrekSB Could you add default value parameter to remove ambiguity? Like in_get(T temp = T())? –  Bartek Banachewicz Sep 5 '12 at 10:48
    
You need to explicitly provide template arguments: pastebin.com/G5dFUsSi –  jrok Sep 5 '12 at 10:48
    
Ok, sorted out the problems, and linked to ideone.com to prove it works. –  ronalchn Sep 5 '12 at 11:01
1  
You can use auto instead of re-specifying the type. –  ronalchn Sep 5 '12 at 11:13

I'm assuming that you will want to initialize a global variable, since for a local variable it just seems like a very awkward choice to forgo three lines of plain and understandable statements in order to have a constant of questionable value.

At the global scope, we can't have errors in the initialization, so we'll have to handle them somehow. Here are some ideas.

First, a templated little construction helper:

template <typename T>
T cinitialize(std::istream & is) noexcept
{
    T x;
    return (is && is >> x) ? x : T();
}

int const X = cinitialize<int>(std::cin);

Note that global initializers must not throw exceptions (under pain of std::terminate), and that the input operation may fail. All told, it's probably pretty bad design to initialize global variables from user input in such a fashion. Perhaps a fatal error would be indicated:

template <typename T>
T cinitialize(std::istream & is) noexcept
{
    T x;

    if (!(is && is >> x))
    {
        std::cerr << "Fatal error while initializing constants from user input.\n";
        std::exit(1);
    }

    return x;
}

Just to clarify my position after some discussion in the comments: In a local scope I would never resort to such an awkward crutch. Since we're processing external, user-supplied data, we basically have to live with failure as part of the normal control flow:

void foo()
{
    int x;

    if (!(std::cin >> x)) { /* deal with it */ }
}

I leave it up to you to decide whether that's too much to write or too hard too read.

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3  
@AntonGolov: Throwing an exception from a global initializer terminates the program. –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 11:07
3  
@KerrekSB: Global initialisers are allowed to throw exceptions (for some value of "allowed" - it will cause a call to std::terminate); and there's no indication that the OP wants to initialise globals this way. –  Mike Seymour Sep 5 '12 at 11:07
1  
Btw, I don't think you need to double check if the stream itself is valid, this will be done inside operator>> anyways. –  Xeo Sep 5 '12 at 11:22
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Stop the FUD about exceptions. Throwing an exception during dynamic initialization will NOT cause anything bad to happen. Letting the exception escape will. As such, there is no need for every caller to bear the burden of using such a subpar error reporting method. Use exceptions, and if someone wants to use the function in a SSDO initializer they will take care to e.g. wrap the call in a try-catch block in a lambda. I know you're better than irrationally being afraid of exceptions. –  Luc Danton Sep 5 '12 at 19:21
1  
The OP does not explicitly say that this is about initializing namespace scope variables. Regardless, a future visitor might take from your answer at face value and really hold that using exceptions in SSDO initializers is intractable. –  Luc Danton Sep 5 '12 at 19:28

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