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I have the following class:

class ValueSetter: public IValueSetter
{
public:
    explicit ValueSetter(CContainer* container)
        : _container(container)
    {
    }

    virtual void operator()(const int value, const int index) const
    {
        _container->values[index].value.i = value;
    }

    virtual void operator()(const double value, const int index) const
    {
        _container->values[index].value.d = value;
    }

    virtual void operator()(const std::string& value, const int index) const
    {
        ...
        _container->values[index].value.s = _strdup(value.c_str());
    }

private:
    CContainer* _container;
};

This class operates on CContainer which stores its data in a buffer of unions. I pass ValueSetter to a Container class which has no knowledge of CContainer. Indeed, in the future I'm hoping that CContainer (which I received via a C API) will disappear and that the values are instead organised in a std::vector or std::list. My Container's interface shouldn't need to change because of this and shouldn't care about how the data is stored in memory.

With this in mind, I'd prefer instead something roughly along these lines:

class IntValueSetter: public IIntValueSetter
{
public:
    explicit IntValueSetter(Container* container)
        : _container(container)
    {
    }

    virtual void operator()(const int value, const int index) const
    {
        _container->values[index].value.i = value;
    }
private:
    CContainer_3* _container;
}

or:

class IntValueSetter: public IIntValueSetter
{
public:
    explicit IntValueSetter(std::vector<int> values)
        : _values(values)
    {
    }

    ... 
}

but I'd need to be able to use them as follows:

ValueSetter<int> valueSetter;

instead of

IntValueSetter valueSetter;

How can I do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just do the obvious. There's no requirement that a template specialization have anything in common with another specialization or with the original template. So:

class IIntValueSetter {
};

template <class Ty> class ValueSetter; // declared but not defined

template <>
class ValueSetter<int> : public IIntValueSetter {
    // whatever
};

ValueSetter<int> vsi;
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What would you do to avoid an IIntValueSetter interface, using instead a IValueSetter<int> interface as the base –  Baz Sep 5 '12 at 11:14
    
I don't know; you haven't said anything about it. But as you suggest, a template could be the right answer. –  Pete Becker Sep 5 '12 at 11:44
    
I have added my own answer to this question where I show two implementations of the interface. –  Baz Sep 5 '12 at 11:52

If I get you right, you just need to write a class template:

template <typename T>
class ValueSetter
{
public:
    explicit ValueSetter(std::vector<T> values): _values(values)
    {
    }
    virtual void operator()(const T value, const int index) const
    {
        _container->values[index].value.i = value;
    }
// etc.
};
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No this wont work since, for example, double are stored in the d union member not the i (int) member. –  Baz Sep 5 '12 at 11:05
    
@Baz - but that suggests that the interface to the container isn't rich enough; if it can be enhanced to provide overloaded setters for each of the various types that it can handle, then the code above can just call the setter, and overload resolution will pick the appropriate one. –  Pete Becker Sep 5 '12 at 11:09
    
@Pete Becker Sorry, I don't follow. Can you elaborate a little? Thanks! –  Baz Sep 5 '12 at 11:20
    
@Baz - _container->values[index].set(value); where set is overloaded for int, float, and whatever other types the container can hold. The various set functions put the value into the appropriate member of the union. –  Pete Becker Sep 5 '12 at 11:40
    
@Pete Becker The type of _container->values[index] is a struct type defined in a C API. I can't add members to it as I don't own it. The CContainers can contain a huge amount of data and I can't afford to copy them with another structure in mind. –  Baz Sep 5 '12 at 11:51

I guess I'm looking for something like this. I've only implemented for int below, but each type would get its own interface class and implementation class. I'd love to hear your comments on this approach!

template<typename V>
class IValueSetter
{
public:
};

template<>
class IValueSetter<std::string> 
{
public:
    virtual void operator()(const std::string& value, int index) const = 0;
};

template<typename V>
class ValueSetter
{
};

template<>
class ValueSetter<std::string>: public IValueSetter<std::string>
{
public:
    explicit ValueSetter2(CContainer* container)
        : _container(container)
    {
    }

    void operator()(const std::string& value, int index) const
    {
        _container->values[index].value.s = _strdup(value.c_str());
    }

private:
    CContainer* _container;
};

template<>
class NewValueSetter<std::string>: public IValueSetter<std::string>
{
public:
    explicit NewValueSetter(std::shared_ptr<std::list<std::string>> values)
        : _values(values)
    {
    }

    void operator()(const std::string& value, int index) const
    {
        (*values)[index] = value;
    }

private:
    std::shared_ptr<std::list<std::string>> _values;
};
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