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I'm having trouble sorting a string list in Delphi XE2. Here's an example:

procedure AddText();
var
  StrList:  TStringList;
begin
  StrList := TStringList.Create();
  StrList.Add('Test1');
  StrList.Sort();
  WriteLn('Sorted: ' + BoolToStr(StrList.Sorted, true)); // Prints "Sorted: false"
  StrList.Add('Test2');
  StrList.Sort();
  WriteLn('Sorted: ' + BoolToStr(StrList.Sorted, true)); // Prints "Sorted: false"
  StrList.Add('Test3');
  StrList.Free();
end;

The problem, as far as I understand, is due to the fact that TStringList.Sorted is never set to true (neither directly nor using SetSorted). Is it just me or is it a bug?

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3  
Sorted never tells you about the state of the list. Sorted is a property that you set that controls how the list behaves. When it is false, you add to the list and new items are appended at the end. When Sorted is true, new items are always inserted ordered. That is, if your list has 'b', 'c' and 'd', and you then add 'a', it is added to the head of the list. –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '12 at 14:04
    
They should have called it AutoSortNewItems (; –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Sep 5 '12 at 16:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There's nothing in the Classes unit for TStringList.Sort that should make you expect it to change the property. The TStringList.Sort method simply calls CustomSort with the default sorting function. It's not an indicator of the state of the list (sorted or unsorted); it merely determines whether the list is sorted using the internal sort algorithm and new items are added to the proper location instead of the end. From the documentation:

Specifies whether the strings in the list should be automatically sorted.

Set Sorted to true to cause the strings in the list to be automatically sorted in ascending order. Set Sorted to false to allow strings to remain where they are inserted. When Sorted is false, the strings in the list can be put in ascending order at any time by calling the Sort method.

When Sorted is true, do not use Insert to add strings to the list. Instead, use Add, which will insert the new strings in the appropriate position. When Sorted is false, use Insert to add strings to an arbitrary position in the list, or Add to add strings to the end of the list

You're using it wrong in the first place, though. Simply add all of your strings to the StringList, and then set Sorted := True;. It will properly set the property value and call the internal Sort method for you automatically.

procedure AddText();
var
  StrList:  TStringList;
begin
  StrList := TStringList.Create();
  StrList.Add('Test1');
  StrList.Add('Test2');
  StrList.Add('Test3');
  StrList.Sorted := True;
  // Do whatever
  StrList.Free;
end;

(You particularly don't want to call Sort() after every single item is added; that's extremely slow and inefficient.)

share|improve this answer
    
+1. another option is to set .Sorted := True before adding the strings. when you add a new string it will be inserted in the right order position. I believe this is faster (since Add method will use Find and add the new string right after that index). –  kobik Sep 5 '12 at 13:44
    
@kobik, it's actually slower (because it has to use Find and do an insert after every string. If you set Sorted := False, add all the strings, and then set Sorted to true, the sort is only done once and there is no find or insert. –  Ken White Sep 5 '12 at 14:07
1  
That's still O(n log n) in comparisons. Same as Quicksort. Unless the list is already sorted! But you pay the penalty of the insertions having to move up the existing values. –  David Heffernan Sep 5 '12 at 14:24
    
Ken is probably right with the speed issue - Inserts vs ExchangeItems of the sort procedure. –  kobik Sep 5 '12 at 14:26
    
@David: O(n log n) is great, but it doesn't beat doing no comparisons at all. :-) And I mentioned the insertion overhead in my comment as well. –  Ken White Sep 5 '12 at 14:32

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