Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class:

class Product
{
    public String Name { get; private set; }
    private List<Release> releases;
    private List<Area> areas;

    public List<Release> Releases
    {
        get
        {
            return new List<Release>(releases);
        }
        private set
        {
            releases = value
        }
    }

    public List<Area> Area
    {
        get
        {
            return new List<Area>(areas);
        }
        private set
        {
            areas = value
        }
    }

    public Product(String Name)
    {
        this.Name = Name;
        this.Releases = new List<Release>();
        this.Areas = new List<Area>();
    }

    public Product(String Name, List<Release> Releases, List<Area> Areas)
    {
        this.Name = Name;
        this.Releases = Releases;
        this.Areas = Areas;
    }
}

My understanding is that Mongodb bson serializer will not be able to automatically de/serialize Product objects because all the properties/fields don't have public read and write access and I do not supply a no argument constructor. How could I go about configuring this to be fully de/serializable ? I have looked into the serialization tutorial on the mongodb.org but it didn't cover this scenario. I also found this https://jira.mongodb.org/browse/CSHARP-476 enhancement but it doesn't look to be implemented yet.

Currently I have another class ProductDoc which has the same field/properties but they have full public read and write access and I supply a no argument constructor so mongodb driver can automapp this type without any problems, and I just convert Product objects to ProductDoc objects and vice versa when I need to read write to the DB. But this seems very hacky even though it is very simple.

UPDATE:

It seems that it does not matter one jot that the set accessors on my public properties are private only that the property itself is public and the lack of a no-argument constructor doesn't seem to affect the de/serialization process either. Can anyone confirm how this works? and whether the info here is correct.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The quickstart tutorial is correct. You can use private getters and setters for those. But, if you are ever concerned, whipping up a test program to try stuff out is always the best answer. The "public" read/write indicates that one of the getters or setters needs to be public.

share|improve this answer
    
I have whipped up a test program, and you are of course correct. I have since discovered the art of reflection. –  0xor1 Sep 6 '12 at 21:12
    
Yes. Reflection = awesome. We have needed to use it abundantly in the mapping api as well as in our linq provider. Be careful, as reflection is slow. We have optimized in a number of places by compiling the getters and setters at runtime. Have Fun!!! –  Craig Wilson Sep 6 '12 at 21:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.