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I'm using the Window's API RegisterHotKey function to run a macro when the F2 key is pressed while a specific application is open and focused.

The problem is, this is stopping the F2 key from working for other applications, such as Excel.

How can I prevent RegisterHotKey from stopping the default action?

I have a system tray application that uses the HotKeyManager class from this answer to register hotkeys. When a specific key is pressed (for example, F2), I use the Windows API to check if a closed-source application is open and focused, and if so send it a series of SendKeys.

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If you care only about a specific app then RegisterHotKey() is the wrong approach. Use SetWindowsHookEx() instead to set a low-level keyboard hook, GetForegroundWindow + GetWindowThreadProcessId to find out what process owns the foreground window. –  Hans Passant Sep 5 '12 at 13:26
    
Hans, you should make that an answer. I think that's the correct thing to do. –  Andy Davis Sep 5 '12 at 13:29
1  
From what I understand - you want your global hotkey to work only when one or more selected apps are focused. Can't you simply SendKeys the intercepted strokes if you determine that an incompatible app is in the foreground? Do you do this? –  ananthonline Sep 5 '12 at 14:28
    
@ananthonline I didn't think to try that. I'll give it a try and let you know if it works or not, although I'm still interested in trying out SetWindowsHookEx() too :) –  Rachel Sep 5 '12 at 14:34
    
@ananthonline That actually worked out just fine in my case. I still plan on investigating SetWindowsHookEx when I get more time, but for now your solution worked great. You should post it as an answer :) –  Rachel Sep 5 '12 at 15:58
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From what I understand, you want your global hotkey to work only when one or more selected apps are focused. Can't you simply SendKeys the intercepted strokes if you determine that an incompatible app is in the foreground?

For example,

if (IsSpecificWindowFocused())
{
    // Do work
}
else
{
    // Resend the key to whatever window is current
    SendKeys.Send("{F2}");
}
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Thanks, this works fine for my situation. I still plan on looking into global keyboard hooks at some point, but this was a nice easy solution that fixed my immediate problem :) –  Rachel Sep 5 '12 at 16:11
    
So if you're only interested in it a tiny subset of time, why captrue it ALL the time? As per the other answer, if you want one that is specific to a single application, create one that is specific to a single application. –  Deanna Sep 6 '12 at 15:17
    
@Deanna As I understand the OP's question "I use the Windows API to check if a closed-source application is open and focused and if so send it a series of SendKeys" - the application that needs to be sent the "macro" cannot be altered. In this case, a global hotkey is the only option. –  ananthonline Sep 6 '12 at 15:30
    
Also see this comment from the linked answer - stackoverflow.com/questions/12281442/… –  ananthonline Sep 6 '12 at 15:43
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RegisterHotKey is global, so it is going to trap all of those keystrokes (in other words, I don't believe it is possible to do exactly what you ask).

However, this thread Global Keyboard Hooks (C#) talks about creating a keyboard message filter, which is (I believe) more like what you are going for.

To clarify: RegisterHotKey is going to be best for things like tray apps and anywhere else where you want an OS wide keyboard short cut that doesn't rely on the app being in focus.

Application.AddMessageFilter() is what you want when you want consistent handling of a particular keystroke, but only when your app already has focus.

A way to do what you're describing and still stay in .NET would be to monitor what processes are running on the OS and only enable the global hook when your app is running.

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I do not actually have access to the application code, so cannot setup a hook from within the application. The current procedure simply checks if a specific window has focus through the Windows API, and if so runs a series of SendKeys –  Rachel Sep 5 '12 at 13:05
    
@Rachel Do you have access to the code of the application that runs RegisterHotKey? That's the one that should set up a keyboard hook. It's not clear to me from your comment whether you lack the code for that, or for the "specific application" in the first sentence of your question. If the latter, you still don't need to modify that "specific application". –  hvd Sep 5 '12 at 13:08
    
@hvd I have access to a tray application, which runs RegisterHotKey. I think I may have misunderstood the code posted in the link you provided :) –  Rachel Sep 5 '12 at 13:11
    
@Rachel For a tray application, you're generally going to need to RegisterHotKey because it will not have focus. Can you lay out what you're trying to do in a bit more detail? –  Andy Davis Sep 5 '12 at 13:18
    
@AndyDavis Sure, I updated my question with the details. Basically the tray application listens for hotkeys and does some action. In this case, F2 is supposed to check if another closed-source application is open and focused, and if so send it a series of SendKeys. Let me know if I can provide any more details. –  Rachel Sep 5 '12 at 13:25
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