Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've developped a DLL for a driver in C. I wrote a test program in C++ and the DLL works fine.

Now I'd like to interract with this DLL using Python. I've successfully hidden most of the user defined C structures but there is one point where I have to use C structures. I'm rather new to python so I may get things wrong.

My approach is to redefine a few structures in python using ctype then pass the variable to my DLL. However in these class I have a custom linked list which contains recursive types as follow

class EthercatDatagram(Structure):
    _fields_ = [("header", EthercatDatagramHeader),
    			("packet_data_length", c_int),
    			("packet_data", c_char_p),
    			("work_count", c_ushort),
    			("next_command", EthercatDatagram)]

This fails, because inside EthercatDatagram, EthercatDatagram is not already defined so the parser returns an error.

How should I represent this linked list in python so that my DLL understands it correctly?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You'll have to access _fields_ statically after you've created it.

class EthercatDatagram(Structure)
  _fields_ = [...]

EthercatDatagram._fields_.append(("next_command", EthercatDatagram))
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work. It compiles and runs, but trying to actually use an instance of the class gives an error: AttributeError: 'EthercatDatagram' object has no attribute 'next_command' –  user9876 Aug 5 '09 at 15:22
    
The correct answer is below, as posted by user9876 You must first declare the class with 'pass', then declare the fields in a second call. Think of it as forward declaration. –  bpescatore Feb 11 '11 at 13:49

You almost certainly want to declare next_command as a pointer. Having a structure that contains itself isn't possible (in any language).

I think this is what you want:

class EthercatDatagram(Structure):
    pass
EthercatDatagram._fields_ = [
    ("header", EthercatDatagramHeader),
    ("packet_data_length", c_int),
    ("packet_data", c_char_p),
    ("work_count", c_ushort),
    ("next_command", POINTER(EthercatDatagram))]
share|improve this answer

NOTE: This is wrong. I'm leaving it because there's a useful discussion, but beware. See comments.

Look carefully at what you're doing. You're creating a class, then you're trying to initialize a structure to contain links to the class, not an instance of the class. Is that what you intend?

If you did want to do that, and it may be perfectly reasonably when working with ctypes, remember python is a dynamic language. If you define the class before hand, you can always redefine it:

'''
Created on Aug 4, 2009

@author: lloyd
problem on stack overflow
'''
from ctypes import *

class Structure(object):
    pass

class EthercatDatagramHeader(object):
    pass

class EthercatDatagram(Structure):
    pass

class EthercatDatagram(Structure):
    _fields_ = [("header", EthercatDatagramHeader),
                        ("packet_data_length", c_int),
                        ("packet_data", c_char_p),
                        ("work_count", c_ushort),
                        ("next_command", EthercatDatagram)]
share|improve this answer
1  
This creates two different classes called EthercatDatagram. The second class contains the first. So it won't work. (Think of "class Foo: ..." as a short form of "Foo = class(name="Foo", ...)".) –  user9876 Aug 4 '09 at 16:14
    
Blast, he's right (or she's right). It's kind of tricky to test, but if you do: fred = EthercatDatagram() print(dir(EthercatDatagram)) print(dir(fred._fields_[4][1])) then second object doesn't have the fields structure. Sorry, I'm back to the drawing board... –  A. L. Flanagan Aug 5 '09 at 16:14

The reason why

EthercatDatagram._fields_.append(("next_command", EthercatDatagram))

does not work is that the machinery that creates the descriptor objects (see the source of the PyCStructType_setattro function) for accessing the next_command attribute is activated only upon assignment to the _fields_ attribute of the class. Merely appending the new field to the list goes completely unnoticed.

To avoid this pitfall, use always a tuple (and not a list) as the value of the _fields_ attribute: that will make it clear that you have to assign a new value to the attribute and not modify it in place.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.