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I have some code that has structure equivalent to this:

import Debug.Trace

newtype SomeExpensiveHiddenType = SCHT Double

expensive :: Double -> Double -> SomeExpensiveHiddenType
expensive a b = SCHT $ trace "call expensive" (*) a b

cheap :: SomeExpensiveHiddenType -> Double -> Double
cheap (SCHT x) c = trace "call cheap" (+) x c

f1 :: Double -> Double -> Double -> Double
f1 a b c = let x = expensive a b in cheap x c

i.e. f1 is a function that computes an expensive result based upon the first two arguments, and then uses this with the third argument. I had hoped that a partial application on the the first 2 arguments, then repeated application of the 3rd argument would result in the expensive computation only being run once. Unfortunately this is not the case:

test1 = do
    putStrLn "test 1"
    let p = f1 2 3
    print (p 0.1)
    print (p 0.2)
    print (p 0.3)

results in:

*Main> test1
test 1
call cheap
call expensive
6.1
call cheap
call expensive
6.2
call cheap
call expensive
6.3
*Main> 

I've come up with what seems to be a solution:

newtype X a = X { unX :: a }
f2 :: Double -> Double -> X (Double -> Double)
f2 a b = let x = expensive a b in X (cheap x)

test2 = do
    putStrLn "test 2"
    let p = unX $ f2 2 3
    print (p 0.1)
    print (p 0.2)
    print (p 0.3)

resulting in:

*Main> test2
test 2
call cheap
call expensive
6.1
call cheap
6.2
call cheap
6.3
*Main> 

But this seems quite messy. Is there a cleaner way I can avoid the redundant calls to the expensive calc?

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3  
Also, don't test such things in ghci, compile with optimisations. In simple cases like this, GHC will then share p even with the original definition of f1. (But you should use dbaupp's advice nevertheless, in more complicated situations, the compiler may not be able to introduce the sharing itself.) –  Daniel Fischer Sep 5 '12 at 15:30
    
I consciously used ghci here, as relying on optimisations seems dangerous. The runtime of the real program will differ by a order of magnitude if the sharing is not discovered. –  timbod Sep 8 '12 at 5:10
    
Right, you shouldn't (blindly) rely on optimisations. That's why I said you should follow dbaupp's advice. Nevertheless, if you want to know how your code will behave, there's no substitute for actually testing your code. The code you're testing in ghci is different, it can have completely different characteristics than the real code. GHCi is great for testing correctness, but neither for speed nor memory usage. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 8 '12 at 16:21
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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can just put the third argument inside the let, so that x is shared.

f2 a b = let x = expensive a b in \c -> cheap x c

(In this case f2 a b = let x = expensive a b in cheap x works too.)


What you are looking for is compiler-driven partial evaluation, and that is a hard problem... at least it is sufficiently hard to implement properly that it isn't in GHC.

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(That was quick!) I confirm that does indeed solve my problem. Until now, I would have considered my f1 and your f2 to be equivalent. I'll need to keep this transform in mind in future whenever I write functions intended to be partially applied. –  timbod Sep 5 '12 at 13:41
    
@timbod your f1 is \a->\b->\c-> let x=expens a b in cheap x c, and the f2 here is \a->\b->let x=expens a b in \c-> cheap x c. Which by eta-reduction is \a->\b->let x=expens a b in cheap x (here too). Which is exactly equivalent to your f2, :) there's not even any boxing involved because newtype is eliminated at compile-time. newtype is usually used to allow for alternative instance implementation of some typeclass or some type trickery. To float that let x=expens a b above \c-> lambda is a bold move, tough 4 a compiler to decide whether it is worth it or not. –  Will Ness Sep 11 '12 at 7:39
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