Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code :

{

    identifier = "hand:" .. card.name,
    area = { x, y, 100, 100 },
    on_click = function()
        -- Code goes here
    end

}

I want to use the card variable and a reference to the object where this code is placed to modify a variable of the class with a value of the card variable.

So, how can I give parameters from the local context to the function who will be called in other pieces of code ?

I wish to launch the on_click function in an event management loop.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

save it when you assign the function, like this

{
    identifier = "hand:" .. card.name,
    area = { x, y, 100, 100 },
    on_click = function()
        local a_card = card
        print(a_card.name)
    end
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The { and } in the original question were creating a table. They weren't a C mistake; that was valid Lua syntax. Unliked yours, which isn't. –  Nicol Bolas Sep 5 '12 at 15:00
    
I don't completly understand how the variables scope works, but card is accessible from the on_click function even it is called in another place. –  MARTIN Damien Sep 5 '12 at 20:21
    
You do not need to "save it", you can use card directly from the on_click function, since it appears it is a local variable in outer scope (outside the {}). Lua uses full lexical scoping, this means that your function (essentially a closure can use any local variables from outer scopes, even after the scope ends and the function is kept as a reference (common for callbacks, handlers). –  Michal Kottman Sep 6 '12 at 10:43
add comment

If I understand the question correctly, you want to be able to reference from on_click handler the object that on_click handler belongs to. To do this, you need to split the statement you have:

local card = { name = "my card" }
local object = {
  identifier = "hand:" .. card.name,
  area = { x, y, 100, 100 },
}
object.on_click = function()
  -- Code goes here
  -- you can reference card and object here (they are upvalues in this context)
  print(card.name, object.area[3])
end
object.click()

You can also define on_click a bit differently; in this case you get object as implicitly declared self variable (note that you call it a bit differently too):

function object:on_click()
  -- Code goes here
  -- you can reference card and object here
  print(card.name, self.area[3])
end
object:click() -- this is the same as object.click(object)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.