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I have a class containing an array I wish to serialize with XmlSerializer:

[XmlArray("properties")]
[XmlArrayItem("property", IsNullable = true)]
public List<Property> Properties { get; set; }

Property is a class containing an attribute and some XmlText:

[XmlAttribute("name")]
public string Name { get; set; }

[XmlText]
public string Value { get; set; }

The problem is that when Value is null, it serializes as an empty string:

<property name="foo" />

rather than a null. I'm looking for the value to either be omitted entirely, or look like this:

<property name="foo" xsi:nil="true" />

Is it possible to null out an element in a list based on its XmlText value? I'm really trying to avoid custom serialization, but perhaps some other serialization framework would be better in this case?

share|improve this question
    
Just firing from the hip - try using public string? Value instead of just public string Value and let us know if it makes a difference. –  Filip B. Vondrášek Sep 7 '12 at 16:42
1  
string is a reference type, so I'm afraid it isn't nullable in that way. –  ladenedge Sep 7 '12 at 17:58
    
Ah, I see. Does this help in any way? –  Filip B. Vondrášek Sep 7 '12 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

Use the IsNullable=true in the XmlArrayItemAttribute class. For an example.

[XmlRoot("Root")]
public class Root
{
    [XmlArrayItem("Element", IsNullable = true)]
    public string[] Elements { get; set; }
}

Some sample code in Visual Studion 2012 and .Net 4.5:

using System.Xml.Serialization;

...

// Test object
Root root;
root = new Root();
root.Elements = new string[] { null, "abc" };

using(MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream())
{
    XmlSerializer xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Root));
    xmlSerializer.Serialize(stream, root);

    Console.WriteLine(new string(Encoding.UTF8.GetChars(stream.GetBuffer())));
}

The output is (line breaks added for clarity):

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<Root 
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Element>
    <string xsi:nil="true" />
    <string>abc</string>
  </Element>
</Root>

And with a complex type (also in .Net 4.5 on Visual Studio 2012):

    public class MyProperty
    {
        public string Foo { get; set; }
    }

    [XmlRoot("Root")]
    public class Root
    {
        [XmlArrayItem("Element", IsNullable = true)]
        public MyProperty[] Elements { get; set; }
    }

    ,,,

    Root root;
    root = new Root();
    root.Elements = new MyProperty[] { null, new MyProperty{ Foo = "bar" } };

    // Other code is as above

Using the same code above produces:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<Root 
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <Elements>
    <Element xsi:nil="true" />
    <Element>
      <Foo>bar</Foo>
    </Element>
  </Elements>
</Root>

Also remember that the type must be a reference type (not a struct, for example) to write out xsi:nil=true.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not using XmlElement at all. I have a schema, but I'm afraid I don't understand how that would help..? –  ladenedge Sep 10 '12 at 1:20
    
@ladenedge I have corrected my answer and added sample code. –  akton Sep 10 '12 at 2:32
    
I have IsNullable = true on my [XmlArrayItem] declaration. It seems to work differently when the array items are a complex type. –  ladenedge Sep 12 '12 at 5:40
    
@ladenedge I tried with a complex type (see updated answer) and it still output with xsi:nil="true". May this is a bug in earlier versions of the framework or the complex type is a struct or other value type. –  akton Sep 12 '12 at 9:40
    
Sorry, I'm not being clear. This question is about setting an element to nil when its [XmlText] is null, not when the array item itself is null. –  ladenedge Sep 12 '12 at 18:08

One thought - you could use "NameSpecified", but check the value of "Value" in the get. Meaning, if Value is null, then Name will not be output either.

Unfortunately, you will still have a null property xml element, tho; I hope that's more acceptable...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ObjectWithProperties obj = new ObjectWithProperties()
        {
            Properties = new List<Property>()
        };

        Property p = new Property();
        p.Name = "This WILL Show Up";
        p.Value = "I'm here";
        obj.Properties.Add(p);

        Property p1 = new Property();
        p1.Name = "This Will NOT Show Up";
        obj.Properties.Add(p1);

        Console.WriteLine(ToXmlString(obj));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static string ToXmlString(object value)
    {
        if (value == null) return string.Empty;
        XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(value.GetType());
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        ser.Serialize(ms, value);
        return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(ms.ToArray());
    }

}
public class ObjectWithProperties
{
    [XmlArray("properties")]
    [XmlArrayItem("property", IsNullable = true)]
    public List<Property> Properties { get; set; }
}

public class Property
{
    [XmlAttribute("name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    [XmlIgnore]
    public bool NameSpecified
    {
        get { return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(Value); }
    }

    [XmlText]
    public string Value { get; set; }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately <property /> is the empty string, not null. –  ladenedge Sep 10 '12 at 1:19

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