Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I upload a file with a struts form. I have the image as a byte[] and I would like to scale it.

FormFile file = (FormFile) dynaform.get("file");
byte[] fileData = file.getFileData(); 
fileData = scale(fileData,200,200);

public byte[] scale(byte[] fileData, int width, int height) {
// TODO 
}

Anyone knows an easy function to do this?

public byte[] scale(byte[] fileData, int width, int height) {
    	ByteArrayInputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(fileData);
    	try {
    		BufferedImage img = ImageIO.read(in);
    		if(height == 0) {
    			height = (width * img.getHeight())/ img.getWidth(); 
    		}
    		if(width == 0) {
    			width = (height * img.getWidth())/ img.getHeight();
    		}
    		Image scaledImage = img.getScaledInstance(width, height, Image.SCALE_SMOOTH);
    		BufferedImage imageBuff = new BufferedImage(width, height, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB);
    		imageBuff.getGraphics().drawImage(scaledImage, 0, 0, new Color(0,0,0), null);

    		ByteArrayOutputStream buffer = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

    		ImageIO.write(imageBuff, "jpg", buffer);

    		return buffer.toByteArray();
    	} catch (IOException e) {
    		throw new ApplicationException("IOException in scale");
    	}
    }

If you run out of Java Heap Space in tomcat as I did, increase the heap space which is used by tomcat. In case you use the tomcat plugin for Eclipse, next should apply:

In Eclipse, choose Window > Preferences > Tomcat > JVM Settings

Add the following to the JVM Parameters section

-Xms256m -Xmx512m

share|improve this question
1  
Guessing here : JPEG doesn't do transparency. Change the TYPE_INT_ARGB to TYPE_INT_RGB and new Color(0,0,0,0) to new Color(0,0,0) –  Kevin Montrose Aug 4 '09 at 17:36
1  
As for heap space, you could save some of space by working directly on an input stream instead of reading it into a byte array. However, to scale an image you need a copy of it (and its scaled version) in memory; so you might just have to increase heap space. Look into java -xmx. –  Kevin Montrose Aug 4 '09 at 18:47
add comment

2 Answers

Depends on the data format.

However, if you're using something like JPEG, GIF, PNG, or BMP you can use the ImageIO class.

Something like:

public byte[] scale(byte[] fileData, int width, int height) {
    	ByteArrayInputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(fileData);
    	try {
    		BufferedImage img = ImageIO.read(in);
    		if(height == 0) {
    			height = (width * img.getHeight())/ img.getWidth(); 
    		}
    		if(width == 0) {
    			width = (height * img.getWidth())/ img.getHeight();
    		}
    		Image scaledImage = img.getScaledInstance(width, height, Image.SCALE_SMOOTH);
    		BufferedImage imageBuff = new BufferedImage(width, height, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_RGB);
    		imageBuff.getGraphics().drawImage(scaledImage, 0, 0, new Color(0,0,0), null);

    		ByteArrayOutputStream buffer = new ByteArrayOutputStream();

    		ImageIO.write(imageBuff, "jpg", buffer);

    		return buffer.toByteArray();
    	} catch (IOException e) {
    		throw new ApplicationException("IOException in scale");
    	}
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Please, update your code with the tested code i posted in my question. I will clean the question, and accept your answer. –  Sergio del Amo Aug 6 '09 at 7:06
    
@Kevin Montrose shouldn't you close the open streams after resizing ? –  MahmoudS Jan 15 '13 at 10:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.