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In the following example kernel, I am looking up two elements in one array, then using the sum of those values to lookup an element from a second array. The result is always zero which is unexpected.

If I rewrite the kernel using fragments of the original expression (see examples below), I do not see this behavior. I only see the problem if I try to read from two different global memory arrays. What is going on here?

I suspect my own ignorance of the specs, here. I'm new to OpenCL. But I can't find anything in the specs to explain this behavior.

What I want to know is this: What am I missing... and bonus, where in the specs can I find an explanation for this behavior.

(FWIW in my tests, this happens EVERY time on a GPU, but NEVER on a CPU).

__kernel void wtf(__global const uchar *gflog, __global const uchar *gfinvlog, __global uchar *out)
{
    out[0] = gfinvlog[gflog[19] + gflog[3]]; // <- replacing this line as follows below:
}

// out[0] = gflog[19];
// RESULT: 14

// out[0] = gflog[3];
// RESULT: 25

// out[0] = gflog[19] + gflog[3];
// RESULT: 39

// out[0] = gfinvlog[39];
// RESULT: 53

// out[0] = gfinvlog[gflog[19] + gflog[3]];
// EXPECTED: 53
// RESULT: 0  <- wtf???

Also, FWIW, I also encountered similar unexpected results trying to add from two different arrays

// out[0] = gfinvlog[39] + gflog[19];
// EXPECTED: 67
// RESULT: 0  <- wtf???

And also see it if I even read from the second array after reading from the first.

// out[0] = gfinvlog[39];  // <- works by itself, but
// out[1] = gflog[19];     // <- this line makes both lines not work
// EXPECTED: [ 53, 14 ]
// RESULT: [ 0, 0 ]  <- wtf???

Then even stranger...

// out[0] = 7;             // <- see if a literal constant works
// out[1] = gfinvlog[39];  
// out[2] = gflog[19];     
// RESULT: [ 0, 0, 0 ]  <- nope, not even that


// out[0] = 7;            // <- keep this...
// out[1] = gfinvlog[39];  
// out[2] = gflog[19];     
// out[3] = gfinvlog[39]; // <- ...and add this line: now it works?
// RESULT: [ 7, 53, 14, 53 ]  <- Tada! but still wtf??? why now?

[EDIT] I am using jocl in Java. The host code that reproduces this is as follows:

import static org.jocl.CL.*;
import org.jocl.*;


public class jocltest {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // declarations
        cl_kernel kernel;
        cl_program program;
        cl_command_queue commandQueue;
        cl_context context;
        cl_mem memGfLog;
        cl_mem memGfInvLog;

        int[] logi = new int[] { 0, 255, 1, 25, 2, 50, 26, 198, 3, 223, 51, 238, 27, 104, 199, 75, 4, 100, 224, 14, 52, 141, 239, 129, 28, 193, 105, 248, 200, 8, 76, 113, 5, 138, 101, 47, 225, 36, 15, 33, 53, 147, 142, 218, 240, 18, 130, 69, 29, 181, 194, 125, 106, 39, 249, 185, 201, 154, 9, 120, 77, 228, 114, 166, 6, 191, 139, 98, 102, 221, 48, 253, 226, 152, 37, 179, 16, 145, 34, 136, 54, 208, 148, 206, 143, 150, 219, 189, 241, 210, 19, 92, 131, 56, 70, 64, 30, 66, 182, 163, 195, 72, 126, 110, 107, 58, 40, 84, 250, 133, 186, 61, 202, 94, 155, 159, 10, 21, 121, 43, 78, 212, 229, 172, 115, 243, 167, 87, 7, 112, 192, 247, 140, 128, 99, 13, 103, 74, 222, 237, 49, 197, 254, 24, 227, 165, 153, 119, 38, 184, 180, 124, 17, 68, 146, 217, 35, 32, 137, 46, 55, 63, 209, 91, 149, 188, 207, 205, 144, 135, 151, 178, 220, 252, 190, 97, 242, 86, 211, 171, 20, 42, 93, 158, 132, 60, 57, 83, 71, 109, 65, 162, 31, 45, 67, 216, 183, 123, 164, 118, 196, 23, 73, 236, 127, 12, 111, 246, 108, 161, 59, 82, 41, 157, 85, 170, 251, 96, 134, 177, 187, 204, 62, 90, 203, 89, 95, 176, 156, 169, 160, 81, 11, 245, 22, 235, 122, 117, 44, 215, 79, 174, 213, 233, 230, 231, 173, 232, 116, 214, 244, 234, 168, 80, 88, 175 };
        int[] invlogi = new int[] { 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 29, 58, 116, 232, 205, 135, 19, 38, 76, 152, 45, 90, 180, 117, 234, 201, 143, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96, 192, 157, 39, 78, 156, 37, 74, 148, 53, 106, 212, 181, 119, 238, 193, 159, 35, 70, 140, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, 93, 186, 105, 210, 185, 111, 222, 161, 95, 190, 97, 194, 153, 47, 94, 188, 101, 202, 137, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, 253, 231, 211, 187, 107, 214, 177, 127, 254, 225, 223, 163, 91, 182, 113, 226, 217, 175, 67, 134, 17, 34, 68, 136, 13, 26, 52, 104, 208, 189, 103, 206, 129, 31, 62, 124, 248, 237, 199, 147, 59, 118, 236, 197, 151, 51, 102, 204, 133, 23, 46, 92, 184, 109, 218, 169, 79, 158, 33, 66, 132, 21, 42, 84, 168, 77, 154, 41, 82, 164, 85, 170, 73, 146, 57, 114, 228, 213, 183, 115, 230, 209, 191, 99, 198, 145, 63, 126, 252, 229, 215, 179, 123, 246, 241, 255, 227, 219, 171, 75, 150, 49, 98, 196, 149, 55, 110, 220, 165, 87, 174, 65, 130, 25, 50, 100, 200, 141, 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224, 221, 167, 83, 166, 81, 162, 89, 178, 121, 242, 249, 239, 195, 155, 43, 86, 172, 69, 138, 9, 18, 36, 72, 144, 61, 122, 244, 245, 247, 243, 251, 235, 203, 139, 11, 22, 44, 88, 176, 125, 250, 233, 207, 131, 27, 54, 108, 216, 173, 71, 142, 1 };

        byte[] log = new byte[logi.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < log.length; i++)
            log[i] = (byte)(logi[i] & 0xFF);

        byte[] invlog = new byte[invlogi.length];
        for (int i = 0; i < invlog.length; i++)
            invlog[i] = (byte)(invlogi[i] & 0xFF);

        // Obtain the platform IDs and initialize the context properties
        System.out.println("[opencl] obtaining platform...");
        cl_platform_id platforms[] = new cl_platform_id[1];
        clGetPlatformIDs(platforms.length, platforms, null);
        cl_context_properties contextProperties = new cl_context_properties();
        contextProperties.addProperty(CL_CONTEXT_PLATFORM, platforms[0]);

        context = clCreateContextFromType(contextProperties, CL_DEVICE_TYPE_GPU, null, null, null);
        // or fail over to a CPU device
        if (context == null)
            context = clCreateContextFromType(contextProperties, CL_DEVICE_TYPE_CPU, null, null, null);
        if (context == null)
            throw new RuntimeException("No suitable OpenCL contexts");

        CL.setExceptionsEnabled(true);

        // Get the list of GPU devices associated with the context
        long[] longResult = new long[1];
        clGetContextInfo(context, CL_CONTEXT_DEVICES, 0, null, longResult);
        long contextSize = longResult[0];

        // Obtain the cl_device_id for the first device
        int deviceCount = (int)contextSize / Sizeof.cl_device_id;
        cl_device_id devices[] = new cl_device_id[deviceCount];
        clGetContextInfo(context, CL_CONTEXT_DEVICES, contextSize, Pointer.to(devices), null);

        commandQueue = clCreateCommandQueue(context, devices[0], 0, null);

        StringBuilder prog = new StringBuilder();
        prog.append("__kernel void wtf(\n");
        prog.append("    __global const uchar *gflog,\n");
        prog.append("    __global const uchar *gfinvlog,\n");
        prog.append("    __global uchar *out\n");
        prog.append("    ) {\n");

        //prog.append("    out[0] = 7;\n");
        //prog.append("    out[1] = gfinvlog[39];");  
        //prog.append("    out[2] = gflog[19];");

        prog.append("    out[0] = 7;\n");
        prog.append("    out[1] = gflog[39];");  
        prog.append("    out[2] = gflog[19];");

        prog.append("}\n");

        System.out.println(prog.toString());

        program = clCreateProgramWithSource(context, 1, new String[] { prog.toString() }, null, null);

        // Build the program
        clBuildProgram(program, 0, null, null, null, null);

        // Create the kernel
        kernel = clCreateKernel(program, "wtf", null);

        memGfLog = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_ONLY | CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR, log.length, Pointer.to(log), null);
        memGfInvLog = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_ONLY | CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR, invlog.length, Pointer.to(invlog), null);

        byte[] outBuffer = new byte[16];

        // Allocate the output buffer
        cl_mem memOut = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_WRITE, outBuffer.length, null, null);

        // Set the arguments for the kernel
        int pindex = 0;
        clSetKernelArg(kernel, pindex++, Sizeof.cl_mem, Pointer.to(memGfLog));
        clSetKernelArg(kernel, pindex++, Sizeof.cl_mem, Pointer.to(memGfInvLog));
        clSetKernelArg(kernel, pindex++, Sizeof.cl_mem, Pointer.to(memOut));

        // Set the work-item dimensions
        long global_work_size[] = new long[] { 1 }; // 1 for this test only
        long local_work_size[] = new long[] { 1 };

        // Execute the kernel
        int rval = clEnqueueNDRangeKernel(commandQueue, kernel, 1, null, global_work_size, local_work_size, 0, null, null);
        System.out.println("EXEC RESULT: " + rval);

        // Read the output data
        Pointer pOut = Pointer.to(outBuffer);
        rval = clEnqueueReadBuffer(commandQueue, memOut, CL_TRUE, 0, outBuffer.length, pOut, 0, null, null);
        System.out.println("READ RESULT: " + rval);

        System.out.print("[ ");
        for (int i = 0; i < outBuffer.length; i++)
            System.out.print(outBuffer[i] + " ");
        System.out.println("]");

        // Release kernel, program, and memory objects
        clReleaseMemObject(memOut);

        // cleanup
        clReleaseMemObject(memGfLog);
        clReleaseMemObject(memGfInvLog);
        clReleaseKernel(kernel);
        clReleaseProgram(program);
        clReleaseCommandQueue(commandQueue);
        clReleaseContext(context);

    }

}
share|improve this question
1  
This may have to do with your host code. Can you post it? –  Lubo Antonov Sep 5 '12 at 15:35
    
Edited to include host code (Java/JOCL). –  Warren Sep 5 '12 at 16:13
    
I suspect this has something to do with memory alignment. If I replace the byte/uchar above with int, the behavior goes away. Of course, doing so is not an option for me, so I still need to discover why this doesn't work. –  Warren Sep 5 '12 at 16:29
    
The OpenCL implementation I am using reports itself as "OpenCL 1.2 AMD-APP (923.1)". I found a restriction against writing to sub-32-bit pointers in OpenCL 1.0, but this restriction is gone in later versions of the spec. I mention it here because I suspect that my problems are still related to this quirk. I'm looking to see if this restriction is totally gone or has just moved somewhere else or changed forms. –  Warren Sep 5 '12 at 17:03
    
@warren OpenCL (the kernel language) supports structure packing, you could use that to make sure memory is correctly packed to the right boundaries. –  Thomas Jan 5 '13 at 14:00

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