Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What would be the most pythonic way to convert a list like:

mylist = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]

into chunks of n elements that always start with the last element of the previous chunk. The last element of the last chunk should be identical to the first element of the first chunk to make the data structure circular. Like:

[
[0,1,2,3],
[3,4,5,6],
[6,7,8,0],
]

under the assumption that len(mylist) % (n-1) == 0 . So that it always works nicely.

share|improve this question
1  
So the length of your chunks is your defining variable, or the number of chunks? –  Silas Ray Sep 5 '12 at 15:47
    
@sr2222 could be either, for my problem the number of chunks would actually be the better defining variable –  Goswin Sep 5 '12 at 16:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What about the straightforward solution?

splitlists = [mylist[i:i+n] for i in range(0, len(mylist), n-1)]
splitlists[-1].append(splitlists[0][0])
share|improve this answer
    
perfect! thanks! –  Goswin Sep 5 '12 at 16:08
3  
you can use [(lis+[lis[0]])[i:i+n] for i in range(0, len(lis), n-1)], to skip the second step –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 5 '12 at 16:10

A much less straightforward solution involving numpy (for the sake of overkill):

from numpy import arange, roll, column_stack

n = 4    
values = arange(10, 26)  
# values -> [10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25]

idx = arange(0, values.size, n)   # [ 0  4  8 12]
idx = roll(idx, -1)               # [ 4  8 12  0] 

col = values[idx]                 # [14 18 22 10]

values = column_stack( (values.reshape(n, -1), col) )

[[10 11 12 13 14]
 [14 15 16 17 18]
 [18 19 20 21 22]
 [22 23 24 25 10]]
share|improve this answer
    
is there any benefit in this ? –  Goswin Sep 6 '12 at 11:50
    
It depends. If you use the default array dtype (int64) the pure python solution performs as well as the numpy one. As you start decreasing the integer size, you begin to see significant improvements. See: gist.github.com/3655860 –  gvalkov Sep 6 '12 at 13:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.