Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know there is a similar question at: ContinueWith a Task on the Main thread

but that question is more toward wpf and I cannot seeem to make it work on a console application.

I want to execute a method on a different thread and when that method is completed I want to keep execution on the main thread. I do not want to join method. anyways here is what I have:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "MAIN";

        DoWork(x =>
        {
            Console.Write("Method successfully executed. Executing callback method in thread:" +
                "\n" + Thread.CurrentThread.Name);
        });

        Console.Read();
    }

    static void DoWork(Action<bool> onCompleteCallback)
    {
        Console.Write(Thread.CurrentThread.Name); // show on what thred we are executing

        Task doWork = new Task(() =>
        {
            Console.Write(Thread.CurrentThread.Name); // show on what thred we are executing
            Thread.Sleep(4000);
        });

        Action<Task> onComplete = (task) =>
        {                
            onCompleteCallback(true);
        };

        doWork.Start(); 

        // this line gives an error!
        doWork.ContinueWith(onComplete, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());                       
    }
}

How can I execute the onCompleteCallback method on the main thread?

share|improve this question
2  
Why do you want/need to do this? –  Reed Copsey Sep 5 '12 at 15:52
    
Good question. I where watching some tutorials and where making notes on a console application. I couldnt make it work so I basically ask this question to learn. But I guess it is not necessary to do this. –  Tono Nam Sep 5 '12 at 15:55
1  
Just an FYI - this gets even worse with async/await - if you call await on a task in a console application, things you wouldn't expect tend to happen :) It's due to this same issue occurring under the hood –  Reed Copsey Sep 5 '12 at 15:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

but that question is more toward wpf and I cannot seeem to make it work on a console application.

You can't do this (without a lot of work) in a Console application. The mechanisms built into the TPL for marshaling the call back onto a thread all rely on the thread having an installed SynchronizationContext. This typically gets installed by the user interface framework (ie: Application.Run in Windows Forms, or in WPF's startup code, etc).

In most cases, it works because the main thread has a message loop, and the framework can post a message onto the message loop, which then gets picked up and runs the code. With a console application, it's just a "raw" thread - there is no message loop where a message can be placed.

You could, of course, install your own context, but that's going to be adding a lot of overhead that is likely not necessary.


In a console application, "getting back" to the console thread is typically not necessary. Normally, you'd just wait on the task, ie:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread.CurrentThread.Name = "MAIN";

        Task workTask = DoWork();

        workTask.Wait(); // Just wait, and the thread will continue
                         //  when the work is complete

        Console.Write("Method successfully executed. Executing callback method in thread:" +
                "\n" + Thread.CurrentThread.Name);
        Console.Read();
    }

    static Task DoWork()
    {
        Console.Write(Thread.CurrentThread.Name); // show on what thred we are executing

        Task doWork = new Task(() =>
        {
            Console.Write(Thread.CurrentThread.Name); // show on what thred we are executing
            Thread.Sleep(4000);
        });

        doWork.Start(); 

        return doWork;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
The other problem is that the "main thread" is never not busy doing something to allow going back to some task to execute asynchronously. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 5 '12 at 16:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.