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I'm trying to convert the DATETIME to something that people can actually use. This is the date:

2013-09-05 11:52:10

I'm using:

date("D, d M Y", '2013-09-05 11:52:10');

Is turning into:

Thu, 01 Jan 1970

Makes no sense to me.

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1  
The second argument needs to be an int timestamp php.net/manual/en/function.date.php –  Steve Robbins Sep 5 '12 at 17:16
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What's not human readable about 2013-09-05 11:52:10? –  ceejayoz Sep 5 '12 at 17:17

3 Answers 3

You need to turn the date into a timestamp before passing it to date()

$time = strtotime('2013-09-05 11:52:10');
echo date("D, d M Y", $time);
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I really detest the strtottime() function. If you know the input format, it is far better to use DateTime::CreateFromFormat(). But better yet, just use MySQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP() function, and you won't have to do any kind of conversion first. –  Spudley Sep 5 '12 at 17:22

Is this supposed to be PHP code? If so, the correct is

date("D, d M Y", strtotime('2013-09-05 11:52:10'));

If this has to do with MySql, the correct function to use is DATE_FORMAT (however, what you have is invalid MySql syntax). Please clarify.

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I really detest the strtottime() function. If you know the input format, it is far better to use DateTime::CreateFromFormat(). But better yet, just use MySQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP() function, and you won't have to do any kind of conversion first. –  Spudley Sep 5 '12 at 17:20
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@Spudley: I dislike it as well, but there's a serious counter-argument: it works. It's documented to work. As an engineer I have to put that over personal preference every time. –  Jon Sep 5 '12 at 17:23
    
Both of the other alternatives are documented to work better. Particularly CreateFormFormat() which was created specifically to improve upon the shortcomings of strtotime(). strtotime() does have some very serious issues, particularly when dealing with ambiguous dates (not an issue in this case, but does trip people up). It is also very slow, because it has to work out what format to use before it even starts. If you know the format, don't use strtottime(). If you don't know the format, strtotime() is too risky to use. –  Spudley Sep 5 '12 at 17:26

PHP's date() function can only handle integer timestamp values; it can't process strings as input.

If you need to convert from one string date format to another, you should use the DateTime::CreateFromFormat() method:

$dateObj = DateTime::CreateFromFormat($inputString);
$outputString = $dateObj->Format('D, d M Y');

However, I would recommend writing your query to use MySQL's UNIX_TIMESTAMP() function to get the date into PHP as a numeric timestamp that PHP's date() function can handle:

MySQL:

SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP(yourDateField) as yourDateField_timestamp FROM yourTable ...

Then you can write PHP exactly as you wanted:

PHP:

$dateObj = date('D, d M Y', $row['yourDateField_timestamp']);
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