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Why was destructor of Derived class called in this code?

#include <iostream>

class Base
{
public:
   Base() { std::cout << "Base::Base() \n"; }
   ~Base() { std::cout << "Base::~Base() \n"; } 
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
   Derived() { std::cout << "Derived::Derived() \n"; }
   ~Derived() { std::cout << "Derived::~Derived() \n"; } 
};

Derived foo() { return Derived(); }

int main()
{
   const Derived& instance = foo();
}
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10  
Why wouldn't it be? –  eq- Sep 5 '12 at 17:20
    
Because a Derived object was destroyed. The implication in your question is that you think the destructor wouldn't be called. Why is this? –  Charles Bailey Sep 5 '12 at 17:21
    
What did you expect? You can not return a local object because it will be destroyed as soon as it goes out of scope. –  Vash Sep 5 '12 at 17:23
    
It looks like the entire Base class is nothing but a red herring. It has nothing to do with the question at all?! –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 17:23
3  
@NikitaTrophimov: Why do you think that is relevant? You never delete a Derived object through a pointer to Base. –  Charles Bailey Sep 5 '12 at 17:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why was destructor of Derived class called in this code?

Because the Derived instance created in foo() is going out of scope at the end of main program.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Base {
public:
    Base() {
        std::cout << "Base::Base() \n";
    }
    ~Base() {
        std::cout << "Base::~Base() \n";
    }
};

class Derived: public Base {
public:
    int i;
    Derived() {
        i = 10;
        std::cout << "Derived::Derived() \n";
    }
    ~Derived() {
        i = 0;
        std::cout << "Derived::~Derived() \n";
    }
    int get() {
        return i;
    }
};

Derived foo() {
    return Derived();
}

int main() {
    const Derived& instance = foo();
    cout << instance.i << endl;
    return 0;
}

The output is as follows:

Base::Base()
Derived::Derived()
10
Derived::~Derived()
Base::~Base()
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4  
instance isn't an object. It's a reference. References going out of scope don't usually cause destructors to be called. I think you need to expand your explanation. –  Charles Bailey Sep 5 '12 at 17:23
    
@CharlesBailey, I spoke too soon without checking it's a reference and thought OP got confused with virtual function behavior. Corrected my explanation. Thanks for correcting! –  Vikdor Sep 5 '12 at 17:33
    
In this case, the reference is initialized with a temporary (whose lifetime is extended to match that of the reference), so although instance isn't an object, it has an object associated with it. –  James Kanze Sep 5 '12 at 17:35

To make it more interesting, consider a modified main:

const Base& instance = foo();

That code creates a temporary (the object returned by foo) of type Derived and extends the lifetime of the object by binding it to a constant reference of type Base. The lifetime of the temporary will be extended until the reference goes out of scope at which point the object will get destroyed. The code is roughly translated to:

Derived __tmp = foo();
const Base& instance = __tmp;

At the end of the block holding the reference instance, the __tmp variable also goes out of scope and gets deleted. Note that even with no virtual destructor, the appropriate destructor is called, as __tmp is of type Derived (the type returned by the function).

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