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Please consider the following 2-D Array:

int array[2][2] = {
                    {1,2},
                    {3,4}
                  };

As per my understanding: - 'array' represents the base address of the 2-D array (which is the same as address of the first element of the array, i.e array[0][0]).

  • The actual arrangement of a 2-D Array in memory is like a large 1-D Array only.

  • Now, I know that base address = array. Hence, I should be able to reach the Memory Block containing the element: array[0][0].

  • If I forget about the 2-D array thing & try to treat this array as a simple 1-D array: array[0] = *(array+0) gives the base address of the first array & NOT the element array[0][0]. Why?

  • A 2-D array does not store any memory address (like an Array of Pointers).

  • If I know the base address, I must be able to access this memory as a linear 1- Dimensional Array.

Please help me clarify this doubt.

Thanks.

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7  
Arrays are not pointers. Arrays are not addresses. Arrays are arrays. An array by any other name would be as arrayed. Nothing can take away from the arrayness of an array. Array your rows or arrows rain on your arrears. Raw rows of RAM rule where puny pointers regale the ruse. Repent and receive the awe of the array. –  Kerrek SB Sep 5 '12 at 17:56
    
What is your question exactly? –  Adam Rosenfield Sep 5 '12 at 17:56
    
I tried to access ther first element of the 2-D array as if it was a 1-D array. Since, the base address of 2-D array was known, I expect that array[0] should provide the first element of the 2-D Array (owing to the actual linear arrangement of 2-D array in memory, i.e. treating 2-D array as a large 1-D Array), but the result is an address. –  Sandeep Singh Sep 5 '12 at 17:59
    
@KerrekSB Go on... –  asawyer Sep 5 '12 at 18:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Arrays are not pointers.

In most circumstances1, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted ("decay") to an expression of type "pointer to T", and the value of the expression will be the address of the first element of the array.

The type of the expression array is "2-element array of 2-element array of int". Per the rule above, this will decay to "pointer to 2-element array of int (int (*)[2]) in most circumstances. This means that the type of the expression *array (and by extension, *(array + 0) and array[0]) is "2-element array of int", which in turn will decay to type int *.

Thus, *(array + i) gives you the i'th 2-element array of int following array (i.e., the first 2-element array of int is at array[0] (*(array + 0)), and the second 2-element array of int is at array[1] (*(array + 1)).

If you want to treat array as a 1-dimensional array of int, you'll have to do some casting gymnastics along the lines of

int *p = (int *) array;
int x = p[0];

or

int x = *((int *) array + 0);


1. The exceptions are when the array expression is an operand of the sizeof or unary & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize another array in a declaration.

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-@John Bode: Perfect Explanation. Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks ! –  Sandeep Singh Sep 5 '12 at 18:43
    
You don't have to do casting gymnastics to view the array as one-dimensional. Just do &array[0][0]. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 9 '12 at 12:46

array[0] is a one-dimensional array. Its address is the same as the address of array and the same as the address of array[0][0]:

assert((void*)&array == (void*)&(array[0]));
assert((void*)&array == (void*)&(array[0][0]));

Since array[0] is an array, you can't assign it to a variable, nor pass it to a function (if you try that, you'll be passing a pointer to the first element instead). You can observe that it's an array by looking at (array[0])[0] and (array[0])[1] (the parentheses are redundant).

printf("%d %d\n", (array[0])[0], (array[0])[1]);

You can observe that its size is the size of 2 int objects.

printf("%z %z %z\n", sizeof(array), sizeof(array[0]), sizeof(array[0][0]));

Here's a diagram that represents the memory layout:

+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
|      1      |      2      |      3      |      4      |
+-------------+-------------+-------------+-------------+
 `array[0][0]' `array[0][1]' `array[1][0]' `array[1][1]'
`---------array[0]---------' `---------array[1]---------'
`-------------------------array-------------------------'
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-@Gilles: Actually, it seems to be difficult to absorb that both array and array[0] contains exactly the same value (unlike a 1-D Array) –  Sandeep Singh Sep 6 '12 at 4:08
    
@SandeepSingh array contains more than array[0], it also contains the other elements. There's no difference between 1d and 2d arrays on that point. A 2d array is an array of arrays, each element of array is a 1d array. –  Gilles Sep 6 '12 at 13:31

"Thou shalt not fear poynter arythmethyc"...

int array[2][2] = { { 1, 2}, { 3, 4 } };
int *ptr = (int *)&array[0][0];
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
    printf("%d\n", ptr[i]);
}

Why does this work? The C standard specifies that multidimensional arrays are contigous in memory. That means, how your 2D array is arranged is, with regards to the order of its elements, is something like

array[0][0]
array[0][1]
array[1][0]
array[1][1]

Of course, if you take the address of the array as a pointer-to-int (int *, let's name it ptr), then the addresses of the items are as follows:

ptr + 0 = &array[0][0]
ptr + 1 = &array[0][1]
ptr + 2 = &array[1][0]
ptr + 3 = &array[1][1]

And that's why it finally works.

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Downvoter: reason? –  user529758 Sep 5 '12 at 18:37
    
I think I may have misled you earlier with my comment; after further investigation I now think that your earlier use of cast was perfectly well defined (I am still of the opinion that the current one is clearer, and thus better). (I didn't downvote at any time; quite the opposite.) –  eq- Sep 5 '12 at 18:59
1  
@eq- I'm sure you didn't downvote :) However, I'm still curious what is technically wrong with my answer (SO guidelines say that downvotes should indicate that). –  user529758 Sep 5 '12 at 19:02
  1. The actual arrangement of a 2-D Array in memory is like a large 1-D Array only.

    yes, the storage area is continuous just like 1D arrary. however the index method is a little different.

    2-D[0][0] = 1-D[0] 
    
    2-D[0][1] = 1-D[1] 
    
    ... 
    
    2-D[i][j] = 1-D[ i * rowsize + j]
    
    ...
    
  2. If I forget about the 2-D array thing & try to treat this array as a simple 1-D array: array[0] = *(array+0) gives the base address of the first array & NOT the element array[0][0]. Why?
    the *(array+0) means a pointer to a array. the first element index in such format should be *((*array+0)+0).

    so finally it should be *(*array)

  3. A 2-D array does not store any memory address (like an Array of Pointers). of course, you can . for example ,

    int * array[3][3] ={ null, };
    
  4. If I know the base address, I must be able to access this memory as a linear 1- Dimensional Array.

    use this formal 2-D[i][j] = 1-D[ i * rowsize + j]...

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I like H2CO3's answer. But you can also treat the pointer to the array as an incrementable variable like so:

int array[2][2] = { { 1, 2}, { 3, 4 } };
int *ptr = (int *)array;
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 4; i++) 
{
    printf("%d\n", *ptr);
    ptr++;  
}

the ++ operator works on pointers just fine. It will increment the pointer by one address of it's type, or size of int in this case.

Care must always be used with arrays in c, the following will compile just fine:

int array[2][2] = { { 1, 2}, { 3, 4 } };
int *ptr = (int *)array;
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)  //Note the 100
{
    printf("%d\n", *ptr);
    ptr++;  
}

This will overflow the array. If you are writing to this you can corrupt other values in the program, including the i in the for loop and the address in the pointer itself.

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