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In my program, I decided to wrap the "sockets interface" (actually just the parts I'm using) with a class I called Socket. I'm using two different "domains": AF_PACKET and AF_INET. Because these domains have different address structs, I decided to wrap their addresses too.

I made a small class like the following:

class SockAddress
{
    public:
    SockAddress();

    virtual sockaddr* getAddress();
    virtual socklen_t getAddrLen();

    private:

    sockaddr address_;
};

Based on this class, I made another class that, instead of returning a sockaddr* returned a sockaddr_ll*`

virtual sockaddr_ll* getAddress();
...
sockaddr_ll address_;

In C, they are all pointers. I simply know that everywhere a sockaddr* is required, if I pass a sockaddr_ll* (and pass the corresponding socklen_t size value) there is going to be no problem.

But in C++, when trying to compile, I get an invalid covariant return type error. I've already read about this error here, here, here, and I understand what it means. Anyway, I couldn't find a way to "workaround" this.

My question is: since I want to return pointers (and the pointers will have the same size), is there a way to force the compiler to accept the sockaddr_ll* as a sockaddr*? And, if there is a way, how do I do that?

(If there is no way, what could be the "right way" to solve this problem?)

share|improve this question

In general, if your public API is exposing pointers and encouraging type casting, you need to rework the design.

When you wrap something in a class, the point is to hide details, not just make a struct-like holder for them.

You are designing new types that you want to act as if they are built-in. This means hiding all of those nasty pointers inside of the class.

E.g., make a top-level class that references just abstract things, then subclass if you want to support different low-level APIs...but completely encapsulate those APIs in the subclasses behind the abstract operations, like listen/accept/connect.

class Socket
{
   public:
      Socket(IPAddress address, int port);
      virtual ~Socket() = 0; // close/clean up resources
      virtual void connect() = 0;
      ...
};  

and then subclass the Socket class to encapsulate the details of the low-level API.

Another option is to invert things so that the SockAddress has hidden ops and takes the abstract socket to be worked upon:

class SockAddress
{
      void doSomethingForSocket(Socket *s) { ... }
}

I generally tell people to write the program that uses the API first, and assume you have a rock-star API that does cool things for you:

Socket s("192.168.5.100", 80);
s.connect();
int i;
i << s;
...
ServerSocket server("*", 80);
Socket *client;
while((client = server.accept()) != null) {
   ...
}

then go about making that API. Use the same technique when building the API itself. When writing connect(), what is the next lower set of "nice things" that might exist that would be really nice to have....then make those.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I'm really willing to follow your suggestions in the future. Very nice and useful answer! – vaulttech Sep 5 '12 at 23:06

In C, they are all pointers. I simply know that everywhere a sockaddr* is required, if I pass a sockaddr_ll*

I'd like a reference for that affirmation. I'm pretty sure it breaks the aliasing rules of C.

I've implemented covariant returns like this when it wasn't available on the compiler I was using.

class SockAddress
{
public:
    SockAddress();

    sockaddr* getAddress() { return doGetAddress(); }

protected:
    virtual sockaddr* doGetAddress() { return ...; } 
};

class SockAddress_ll: public SockAddress
{
public:
    SockAddress();
    sockaddr_ll* getAddress() { return static_cast<sockaddr_ll*>(doGetAddress()); }

protected:
    sockaddr* doGetAddress() { return ...; }
};

changing the static_cast by reinterpret_cast would probably do what you want. How wise it is to do it is another matter.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok ok, not everywhere. In fact, when I print the size of sockaddr and sockaddr_ll, the sizes here are 16 and 20, respectively (so, well, they are different). But many of the socket-related calls expect a sockaddr* (i.e., a pointer to an address) and a socklen_t specifying its size (or, at least, this is what I understood so far about using sockets -- I can be wrong). That was what I wanted to "emulate" in my implementation. – vaulttech Sep 5 '12 at 22:56
    
Anyway, thanks for your help! You really solved my problem. I can't believe the answer was so simple. – vaulttech Sep 5 '12 at 23:03

First of all, in a virtual function, you really want the same return type. That's kind of a given, since virtual functions are used so you can have different versions of the same function, with the correct one being used based on the object type. Thus, whoever calls your function doesn't know which version of the function will be used, and thus can't know the return type if they are different.

thus, return sockaddr in either case. If you find that your caller needs to know the actual type returned, you probably don't want to use virtual functions to start with, or you want a non-virtual "getSpecificAddress" or something like that.

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