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can someone explain how to let operations like 3^9999 work in c++, as i found, if number is too long it causes problems. I've heard that there is a way to work it out. (Please do not suggest any external libraries)

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2  
3^9999 is fine in C++ ;) –  eq- Sep 5 '12 at 18:16
1  
If ^ means exponentiation, you need a big-integer library. If you don't want to use an external library, you have to write your own. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 5 '12 at 18:16
9  
When the best solution is to use an external library, but people ask for no suggestions of external libraries, do you know what the solution becomes? Implement on your own what was already implement in an external library. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 5 '12 at 18:18
1  
Nonsense question. Standard function double pow( double base, double exponent); from <cmath> gives me 5.4378339511420862476775224306038e+4770. –  Öö Tiib Sep 5 '12 at 18:22
1  
@ÖöTiib I'm guessing since the OP bothered to ask the question, they want all the digits, though. Why the "do not suggest any external libraries" is beyond me though, (and smells a little of homework?) –  lc. Sep 5 '12 at 18:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Hope you're not looking for optimisation...

int N = 9998;
int M = 5000;
int arr [M];

for ( int j = 0 ; j < M ; ++j )
        arr[j]=0;

arr[M-1] = 3;


for ( int i = 0 ; i < N ; ++i ) {

        for ( int j = 0 ; j < M ; ++j )
                arr[j] = arr[j]*3;

        for ( int j = M-1 ; j > 0 ; --j ) {
                arr[j-1] = arr[j-1] + arr[j]/10;
                arr[j] = arr[j]% 10;
        }
}


for ( int j = 0 ; j < M ; ++j )
        std::cout << arr[j];
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!! great, thank you in advance –  bla2e Sep 5 '12 at 19:09
1  
@bla2e in advance of what? –  weston Sep 12 '12 at 9:22

Since you have asked for a solution that doesn't rely on a library, you'll have to do it the hard way.

Create a function that multiplies two arrays of digits together. You'll need about log10(3)*9999 digits for this, or 4771. Initialize two arrays with all zeros and a 3, then multiply the first by the second for 9998 times.

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so, i'll have 2 arry, and then multiply them... 1) why one of them should be all 0 and another all 3? and where i should store the result? –  bla2e Sep 5 '12 at 18:29
    
@bla2e, what I meant was to start both arrays with 4770 zeros and a single 3 at the end. Do the multiply in place so that the result is in one of the two arrays. –  Mark Ransom Sep 5 '12 at 18:38
    
thank you for intuition –  bla2e Sep 5 '12 at 19:11

Split your problem into three problems.

1) First make solution how to multiply very long integers.

2) turn 9999 into binary 10011100001111. There are 14 bits. 8 bits are set. Set bits (in order from end) mean that 9999 = 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 + 256 + 512 + 1024 + 8192. The factors are useful since 3^2 = 3^1 * 3^1 etc. in general n^(2^m) = n^(2^(m-1)) * n^(2^(m-1)). You can calculate the factors in cycle starting from 3^1 = 3, that makes 13 multiplications.

3) Calculate 3^9999 = 3^1 * 3^2 * 3^4 * 3^8 * 3^256 * 3^512 * 3^1024 * 3^8192 by multiplying the factors into result. That makes 7 more multiplications.

For calculating 3^9999 you need 20 very long integer multiplications.

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Very elegant solution, but it is beyond of my abilities –  bla2e Sep 5 '12 at 19:10
    
It took me a minute to realize the optimization versus my own answer - 3^2=3^1*3^1, 3^4=3^2*3^2 etc. You have 12 multiplications to get the factors 3^1 to 3^(2^13) and 7 more to multiply the 8 required factors. –  Mark Ransom Sep 5 '12 at 21:27
    
Thanks for correcting. I am not sure from where i got 21. –  Öö Tiib Sep 5 '12 at 22:37

Any ideas on how I could make it uglier so his professor won't accept it? =]

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main()
{
    unsigned char ds[9999];
    unsigned char c;
    ds[0] = 3;
    bzero(ds+1, 9998);
    for(int p = 2; p <= 9999; p++)
    {
        c = 0;
        for(int d=0; d<p/2+1; d++)
        {
            ds[d] = ds[d] * 3 + c;
            c = ds[d] / 10;
            ds[d] = ds[d] % 10;
        }
    }
    int d = 9998;
    for(; d>=0; d--)
        if(ds[d] != 0)
            break;
    for(; d>=0; d--)
        printf("%d", ds[d]);
    printf("\n");
}
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there is no professor, just my own curiosity, so u're free to make it as ugly as you wish :) –  bla2e Sep 5 '12 at 19:29

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