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Are the operations on obj below thread safe? I know that method level variables and instances go on each thread's stack - but im not sure what will happen when the local variable is a singleton. foo() is called in a webservice call. I'm curious whether this is thread-safe?

public void foo() {
    SomeObject obj = getSomeObject();  
    obj.doSomething();   // Would this be thread safe?
}

private SomeObject getSomeObject() {
    // returns singleton
    SpringContext.getBean("someObject");
}

class SomeObject {
    int x;
      ...

    // Not synchronized
    public void doSomething() {

    }
}
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if its a singleton (that depands on how u defined it in spring) then no way this is thread safe. you can do a test and chk of course –  yael alfasi Sep 5 '12 at 18:24

3 Answers 3

It depends on what you mean by "thread-safe". If SomeObject.doSomething() mutates the instance in an unsafe way, then no, it's not safe. Two different threads could obtain references to the same object.

Basically, unless SomeObject is designed to be used from multiple threads concurrently, you shouldn't be making it a singleton.

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Am curious - does this apply to singleton local variables alone? ie - if SomeObject was NOT a singleton. Would this then be threadsafe? –  Preator Darmatheon Sep 5 '12 at 18:27
    
I would say that SomeObject needs to be protected if it is used by multiple threads. I wouldn't say that it should not be a singleton given that Spring by default generates singleton beans. –  Gray Sep 5 '12 at 18:28
    
If SomeObject was created per-thread, like with a ThreadLocal, then you would be threadsafe @Preator. It's about whether multiple threads use the same object. –  Gray Sep 5 '12 at 18:29
    
@PreatorDarmatheon: It would entirely depend on how you were fetching it. Basically, if you've got multiple threads with unfettered access to an object, that object had better be thread-safe... –  Jon Skeet Sep 5 '12 at 18:29
    
@Gray: What do you mean by "protected" in this context? If you mean it should be designed to be used from multiple threads concurrently, then you're not disagreeing with my answer. –  Jon Skeet Sep 5 '12 at 18:30

It is thread safe only if the SomeObject is itself thread-safe. If, for example, you read and can change the value of x in the doSomething() call then it would not be thread safe unless it was appropriately locked.

Without knowing more about SomeObject it is impossible to tell exactly whether or not you would have a problem.

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It doesn't have to be immutable - doSomething may not be a synchronized method, but it could still be synchronizing internally, or possibly it could mutate an AtomicInteger etc. –  Jon Skeet Sep 5 '12 at 18:22
    
Good point @Jon. Thanks. –  Gray Sep 5 '12 at 18:24
    
class SomeObject { // Not synchronized public void doSomething() { int x; } } So I'm guessing THIS would be thread safe? (no class level variables) –  Preator Darmatheon Sep 5 '12 at 18:27
    
Again it depends on the rest of the code of SomeObject @Preator. If all you were dealing with is local calculations on the stack, then yes, it would be thread-safe. –  Gray Sep 5 '12 at 18:32

Method/Thread locality may be lost completely when you make any static reference. Since the reference is static the local field pointing to the static reference is not on the thread stack, it may in fact be referenced by other threads.

You have the same thread-safety effect if the Object was assigned globally instead of thread-local.

final SomeObject obj = getSomeObject();
public void foo() {
    obj.doSomething();  
}

private SomeObject getSomeObject() {
    // returns singleton
    SpringContext.getBean("someObject");
}
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