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I am pretty new to Python and ML, so please bear with me on my question.

I have defined a list of ball tree objects as below:

bt = []
#input_numpy_array1 is a numpy array with shape (100,320)  
bt.append(BallTree(input_numpy_array1))

# I take one of the elements of input_numpy_array1 as a sample query.'sample_index' is assumed to be within bounds
sample_query = input_numpy_array1[sample_index,:]

# Find nearest neighbour and compute distance and index
distance, index = bt[0].query(sample_query,1)
print distance[0]
#Output here is 0, as expected as 'sample_query' is a member of the 'input_numpy_array1'

# Adding another BallTree instance to the list
#input_numpy_array2 is a numpy array with shape (70,320)  
bt.append(BallTree(input_numpy_array2))
distance, index = bt[0].query(sample_query,1)
print distance[0]
# Output here is NOT zero (NOT expected!!)

So the question I have here is why would the nearest neighbour distance change for 'sample_query' and bt[0] when I append one more Ball tree object to the Ball tree list 'bt'? I would expect the object bt[0] to be unmodified when I append one more object to the list bt. Is my expectation correct?

I would appreciate any insights into this situation.

Thanks, Archith

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Hi Archith. Could you please provide a self-contained example (i.e. including the input arrays, imports etc), preferably in a github gist? This is really not the expected behavior. –  Andreas Mueller Sep 5 '12 at 20:20
    
Hi Andreas. Thanks for replying. I found a gap in my understanding of BallTree with this example. After a bit of digging, I now understand that (borrowing from the notation in the question) bt[0].data actually points to the input numpy array rather than it being a copy. I was re-using the input numpy array for creating further ball trees and hence the data as seen by bt[0] kept getting clobbered everytime. If I ensure that the numpy array gets created (or allocated in 'C-speak') for each ball tree instance, ball tree query results are consistent. –  Archith John Bency Sep 5 '12 at 21:58

2 Answers 2

You are still doing the query on the same ball tree instance bt[0] in both cases hence you are getting the same results twice which is to be expected. I don't understand why you put BallTree instances in a python list BTW.

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Well, the problem was that I don't see the same results twice. Anyways, I understood where I was going wrong. I have described it in my reply to Andreas. I needed a way to access indexed ball trees based on certain characteristics of the query. There might be better ways of going about it though. –  Archith John Bency Sep 5 '12 at 22:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found a gap in my understanding of BallTree with this example.

After a bit of digging, I now understand that (borrowing from the notation in the question) bt[0].data actually points to the input numpy array rather than it being a copy. I was re-using the input numpy array for creating further ball trees and hence the data as seen by bt[0] kept getting clobbered everytime.

If I ensure that the numpy array gets created (or allocated in 'C-speak') for each ball tree instance, ball tree query results are consistent.

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Indeed, this sounds like an API bug. I think the constructor should be BallTree(data, copy=True) by default so as to make the BallTree keep it's own independent copy of the data by default while allowing the user to avoid the copy if he/she does not have enough memory and knows that she should not update the data when copy=False. Please feel free to open an issue on the github issue tracker for the scikit-learn project: github.com/scikit-learn/scikit-learn/issues –  ogrisel Sep 6 '12 at 21:42

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