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I want to ask someone who has stronger skills than me in C#.

Is it possible to reduce the following code

if(val > 20 && val < 40 )
...
else
if(val > 40 && val < 72 )
...
else
if(val > 72 && val < 88 )
...
else
...

Let's assume that I have over 10-11 if-else statements.

What's the best way to shorten the above code?

I thought at something like between in sql.

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Are you doing entirely different things in each block of code? You could have a list/array with 20,40,72, etc. as long as the block of code can be the same but with the index of which group it's in. –  Servy Sep 5 '12 at 19:14
    
Its possible in VB but to my knowledge not in C#. –  Magnus Sep 5 '12 at 19:15
    
@Magnus To be fair, you can trivially create library-based in syntax which matches the Select Case syntax in VB in conciseness (but yes, none exists in the framework). –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 5 '12 at 19:15
    
try something in vb.net and i will try to convert to c# –  Snake Eyes Sep 5 '12 at 19:16
    
You can build your own "between" function as shown here: stackoverflow.com/questions/5023213/… –  Splendor Sep 5 '12 at 19:16

6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Define an extension method:

public static bool Between(this int source, int a, int b)
{
    return source > a && source < b;
}

Then, use it:

if (val.Between(20, 40))
//...

As oɔɯǝɹ correctly pointed out in his comment, you could go one step further and support all implementers of IComparable<T> with a generic extension method:

public static bool Between<T>(this T source, T a, T b) where T : IComparable<T>
{
    return source.CompareTo(a) > 0 && source.CompareTo(b) < 0;
}
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10  
you could make this a generic extension method as well: public static bool Between<T>(this T source, T a, T b) : where T: IComparable<T> –  oɔɯǝɹ Sep 7 '12 at 19:26
    
excellent suggestion! –  codesparkle Sep 7 '12 at 19:28

An alternate way of doing that is to store your ranges in List and use the Contains function to find out if val is within the range, but without more information it looks like you have it as short as you can make it.

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You can do a between, but it'll be as much, if not more typing to call it. In this case, if you really wanted what between does, then you'd be more concise with:

if(val >= 20 && val <= 88)
{
  if(val <= 40 )
  ...
  else if(val <= 72 )
  ...
}
else
 ...

Note that I'm using <= and >= to match the between behaviour. However, I'm assuming that you did want to neither have two things done for values exactly 40, exactly 72, nor nothing done (in your question, nothing would be done).

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In my opinion it's good to have collection of ranges. And if logic inside blocks is pretty similar, you can store a delegate associated with this range.

RangeBase range = collection.FirstOrDefault(x => x.BelongsToRange(42));
if(range != null)
{
    dynamic result = range.SomeDelegate.DynamicInvoke();
}

Where RangeBase is a simple abstraction:

public abstract class RangeBase
{
    public int MinValue { get; private set; }
    public int MaxValue { get; private set; }

    public abstract Delegate SomeDelegate { get; }

    protected RangeBase(int minValue, int maxValue)
    {
        MinValue = minValue;
        MaxValue = maxValue;
    }

    public bool BelongsToRange(int number)
    {
        return number > MinValue && number < MaxValue;
    }
}
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1  
Like all programming, this is really a trade off between where you are placing your effort. I like the solution, but in the end it is enough work that you probably won't have saved any real-world time for this current project. However, his is a great solution if you find yourself requiring this kind of thing in many projects, in which case you would want to put the abstract bases into a library that you use with all future projects. –  Stuporman Sep 5 '12 at 20:17
class Range{ public int first; public int second}

list<Range> rangeList= new list<Range>

write all combination in list with class

foreach( Range objRange in rangeList)
{
if( val>objRange.first && val<objRange.last)
{......
break;
}
}
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@snake eye try my this approach too may it will short your code in standard way –  Gyan Chandra Srivastava Sep 5 '12 at 19:29
    
You really need to work on your Class/variable names...It will significantly improve the readability of your code. –  Servy Sep 5 '12 at 19:30
    
@Servy pls suggest concept is rht or not i have edited for naming –  Gyan Chandra Srivastava Sep 5 '12 at 19:35
    
It looks quite a bit better now, although local variables (i.e. RangeList) usually start with a lower case letter. The fields in Range are also private currently (that's the default). They should probably be public properties, rather than private fields. –  Servy Sep 5 '12 at 19:37
    
yap sorry for that –  Gyan Chandra Srivastava Sep 5 '12 at 19:39
if(val > 72)
{

}
else 
{
   if(val > 40)
   {
     ...
   }
   else
   {
     ...   
   }
}
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