Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to find the the total number of divisors of a given number N where can be as large as 10^14 .I tried out calculating the primes upto 10^7 and then finding the the divisors using the exponents of the prime factors.However it is turning out to be too slow as finding the primes using the sieve takes 0.03 s. How can I calculate the total number of divisors faster and if possible without calculating the primes? Please pseudo code /well explained algorithm will be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
2  
is this homework? –  Colin D Sep 5 '12 at 19:48
1  
@ColinD: No ,absolutely no .I was just trying to solve some other problem on SPOJ where I needed to calculate the total number of divisors.. –  thedarkknight Sep 5 '12 at 19:50
    
Getting the number of divisors can't be done without prime factorisation as far as I know. The good news is that there are more efficient algorithms for prime factorisation than a simple sieve. –  biziclop Sep 5 '12 at 19:50
1  
I don't think calculating primes up to 10^7 under 0.03s is to be considered slow... –  user529758 Sep 5 '12 at 19:53
2  
if 0.03 seconds is your to slow? please give an estimate of your target time and your system specs. –  Colin D Sep 5 '12 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

Use the sieve of atkin to find all of primes less than 10^7. (there are 664,579 of these)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Atkin

ideally this should be done at compile time.

next compute the prime factorization:

int x; // the number you want to factor
Map<int to int> primeFactor; // this is a map that will map each prime that appears in the prime factorization to the number of times it appears.

while(x > 1) {
  for each prime p <= x {
     if x % p == 0 {
       x = x / p; 
       primeFactor(p) = primeFactor(p) +1;
     }
  }
}

At the end of this, you will have the complete prime factorization. From this you can compute the total number of divisors by iterating over the values of the map: http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/66054/number-of-combinations-of-a-multiset-of-objects

int result = 1;
for each value v in primeFactors {
  result*= (v+1);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
p <= sqrt(x) is enough, although you'd want to calculate it only once and store it in a separate variable. –  biziclop Sep 5 '12 at 20:23
    
@Colin D Except for the fact that I have used the sieve of Eratosthenes instead of Atkin's ,I have done exactly the same steps.How much performance will this change make? –  thedarkknight Sep 5 '12 at 20:27
    
seive of atkins is just an optimization of seive of erotosthenes. –  Colin D Sep 5 '12 at 20:28
    
@ColinD: I am aware of that fact,however I was asking u to quantify the difference it will make in terms of the running time –  thedarkknight Sep 5 '12 at 20:31
1  
The sieve you use shouldn't make any difference though, as you pre-calculate all the primes and store them in an array. –  biziclop Sep 5 '12 at 20:45

I implemented the Sieve of Atkin at my blog, but still found an optimized Sieve of Eratosthenes to be faster.

But I doubt that's your problem. For numbers as large as 10^14, Pollard rho factorization will beat trial division by primes, no matter how you generate the primes. I did that at my blog, too.

share|improve this answer
    
@Sir I did read about the Pollard Rho factorization but was wondering whether it would be an overkill to implement it.Sir,I am not able to understand the implementation on your blog –  thedarkknight Sep 5 '12 at 21:07
    
You might prefer <a href="programmingpraxis.com/2009/06/19/monte-carlo-factorization/…; version. –  user448810 Sep 5 '12 at 23:33
    
@thedarkknight: I put a Python version of a simple pollard rho factoring program at ideone.com/u9r6W; your c++ implementation should be similar. This shows why pollard rho is so fast; even with a limit of 100 steps it was able to compute the factorization, whereas trial division would require 664578 divisions for this composite number. That's an extreme example, to be sure, but if you are trial dividing by primes greater than 1000, it's probably better to switch to pollard rho. –  user448810 Sep 5 '12 at 23:46
    
@thedarkknight: By the way, trial division is O(n ^ 1/2). Pollard rho is O(n ^ 1/4), which is very much better than trial division. –  user448810 Sep 6 '12 at 2:05

You can use Pollard's rho-algorithm for factorization. With all the improvements it is quick for numbers up to at least 10^20.

Here is my implementation for finding a factor in Java:

/**
 * Finds a factor of a number using Brent's algorithm.
 *
 * @param n  The number.
 *
 * @return  A factor of n.
 */
public static BigInteger findFactor(BigInteger n)
{
    final BigInteger result;
    if (n.isProbablePrime(80))
    {
        result = n;
    }
    else
    {
        BigInteger gcd = n;
        BigInteger c = ONE;
        while (gcd.equals(n))
        {
            int limitPower = 0;

            long k = 0;
            BigInteger y = ONE;
            boolean done = false;
            while (!done)
            {
                limitPower++;
                final long limit = Numbers.pow(2, limitPower);
                final int productLimit = (int) Numbers.pow(2, limitPower / 2);

                final BigInteger x = y;
                while (!done && k < limit)
                {
                    final BigInteger savedY = y;
                    int j = 0;
                    final int jLimit = (int) Math.min(productLimit, limit - k);
                    BigInteger p = ONE;
                    while (j < jLimit)
                    {
                        y = next(n, c, y);
                        p = p.multiply(x.subtract(y)).mod(n);
                        j++;
                    }
                    gcd = Numbers.gcd(p, n);

                    if (gcd.equals(ONE))
                    {
                        // Move along, nothing to be seen here
                        k += jLimit;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        // Restart and find the factor
                        y = savedY;
                        while (!done)
                        {
                            k++;
                            y = next(n, c, y);
                            gcd = Numbers.gcd(x.subtract(y), n);
                            done = !gcd.equals(ONE);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            c = c.add(ONE);
        }
        result = gcd;
    }
    return result;
}


private static BigInteger next(BigInteger m, BigInteger c, BigInteger x)
{
    return square(x).subtract(c).mod(m);
}

To factorize numbers up to 1014 you could also just do trial division with odd numbers up to 107.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.