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I'm finalizing my function for safe string retrieval and decided to turn my compiler warnings up to see if any of my code raised any flags.

Currently I am receiving the following compiler warnings on Pelles C IDE:

stringhandle.c(39): warning #2800: Potentially dangling object 'str' used after call to function 'realloc'.
stringhandle.c(50): warning #2800: Potentially dangling object 'str' used after call to function 'realloc'.

Here is my function (read below if you would rather read the question in it's entirety before reading code):

char *getstr(void)
{
    char *str, *tmp;
    int bff = STRBFF, ch = -1, pt = 0;

    if(!(str = malloc(bff)))
    {
        printf("\nError! Memory allocation failed!");
        return 0x00;
    }
    while(ch)
    {
        ch = getc(stdin);
        if (ch == EOF || ch == '\n' || ch == '\r') ch = 0;
        if (bff <= pt)
        {
            bff += STRBFF; 
            if(!(tmp = realloc(str, bff))) 
            {
                free(str);  //line 39 triggers first warning
                str = 0x00;
                printf("\nError! Memory allocation failed!");
                return 0x00;
            }
            str = tmp;
        }
        str[pt++] = (char)ch;
    }
    str[pt] = 0x00;
    if(!(tmp = realloc(str, pt)))
    {
        free(str); //line 50 triggers second warning
        str = 0x00;
        printf("\nError! Memory allocation failed!");
        return 0x00;
    }
    str = tmp;
    return str;
}

I understand why I am being warned that str may be dangling. I am freeing the allocated space pointed to by str if an error occurs, however my function has no further calls to str after it being freed. As a fix I just tried doing free(str) followed by str = 0x00. Shouldn't that make the pointer str no longer dangling? Does it have something to do with my tmp pointer? I don't free or set tmp to 0x00 either since it should already be 0x00 if realloc fails, but should I be setting it to 0x00 on sucess since it is still technically pointing exactly where str is and is no longer needed?

In short my question is why is my compiler warning that str may be dangling, and how can I remove the warning, and am I handling my tmp pointer correctly?

share|improve this question
1  
Ignore the warning. Get used to false positives. Compilers aren't intelligent. –  user529758 Sep 5 '12 at 20:17
2  
which are lines 39 & 50? –  stark Sep 5 '12 at 20:24
1  
Then your compiler is indeed stupid. free(str) is the sensible thing to do. –  larsmans Sep 5 '12 at 20:26
2  
then there's no reason to have str = 0. H2CO3 is correct. –  stark Sep 5 '12 at 20:28
3  
1) you don't need the initial malloc(). Just initialise str =NULL, and the first realloc(NULL, newsize) will work as you intend. 2) your final str[pt] = 0x00; is not needed (when the loop terminates a nul will already have been written (it is the loop condition!) It is also wrong, because after the loop, pt has been bumped and (bff <= pt) could be true. That would cause the final str[pt] = 0; to actually write beyond the allocated size. 3) don't return 0x00 when you can return NULL, it is ugly and confusing. 4) most people would write (pt >= bff) instead of (bff <= pt) –  wildplasser Sep 5 '12 at 20:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just to illustrate my points:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

static inline void * myrealloc(void *org, size_t newsize)
{
char * new;
new = realloc(org, newsize);
if (!new) {
        fprintf(stderr, "\nError! Memory allocation failed!\n");
        free (org);
        return NULL;
        }
return new;
}

char *getstr(void)
{
#define STRBFF 256

    char *str = NULL;
    size_t size , used ;

    for (size=used=0; ; ) {
        int ch;
        if (used >=size) {
            str = myrealloc(str, size += STRBFF);
            if(!str) return NULL;
        }
        ch = getc(stdin);
        if (ch == EOF || ch == '\n' || ch == '\r') ch = 0;
        str[used++] = ch;
        if (!ch) break;
    }
    str = myrealloc(str, used);
    return str;
}

Now, if your compiler supports inlining, the calls to myrealloc() will be replaced by the equivalent of your original code, and the actual myrealloc()function will virtually disappear. (check the disassembled output).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for all your help I greatly appreciate it. –  Keith Miller Sep 6 '12 at 12:51

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