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i am having trouble understanding the difference between the R function rank and the R function order. they seem to produce the same output:

> rank(c(10,30,20,50,40))
[1] 1 3 2 5 4
> order(c(10,30,20,50,40))
[1] 1 3 2 5 4

Could somebody shed some light on this for me? Thanks

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3  
A blog post about this is: portfolioprobe.com/2012/07/26/r-inferno-ism-order-is-not-rank –  Patrick Burns Sep 6 '12 at 8:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted
> set.seed(1)
> x <- sample(1:50, 30)    
> x
 [1] 14 19 28 43 10 41 42 29 27  3  9  7 44 15 48 18 25 33 13 34 47 39 49  4 30 46  1 40 20  8
> rank(x)
 [1]  9 12 16 25  7 23 24 17 15  2  6  4 26 10 29 11 14 19  8 20 28 21 30  3 18 27  1 22 13  5
> order(x)
 [1] 27 10 24 12 30 11  5 19  1 14 16  2 29 17  9  3  8 25 18 20 22 28  6  7  4 13 26 21 15 23

rank returns a vector with the "rank" of each value. the number in the first position is the 9th lowest. order returns the indices that would put the initial vector x in order.

> x[order(x)]
 [1]  1  3  4  7  8  9 10 13 14 15 18 19 20 25 27 28 29 30 33 34 39 40 41 42 43 44 46 47 48 49
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great, thank you. this makes perfect sense. --alex –  Alex Sep 5 '12 at 20:37
3  
Also notice the difference when there are ties. –  Greg Snow Sep 5 '12 at 21:16

I always find it confusing to think about the difference between the two, and I always think, "how can I get to order using rank"?

Starting with Justin's example:

Order using rank:

## Setup example to match Justin's example
set.seed(1)
x <- sample(1:50, 30) 

## Make a vector to store the sorted x values
xx = integer(length(x))

## i is the index, ir is the ith "rank" value
i = 0
for(ir in rank(x)){
    i = i + 1
    xx[ir] = x[i]
}

all(xx==x[order(x)])
[1] TRUE
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As it turned out this was a special case and made things confusing. I explain below for anyone interested:

rank returns the order of each element in an ascending list

order returns the index each element would have in an ascending list

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as is stated by ?order() in R prompt, order just return a permutation which sort the original vector into ascending/descending order. suppose that we have a vector

A<-c(1,4,3,6,7,4);
A.sort<-sort(A);

then

order(A) == match(A.sort,A);
rank(A) == match(A,A.sort);

besides, i find that order has the following property(not validated theoratically):

1 order(A)∈(1,length(A))
2 order(order(order(....order(A)....))):if you take the order of A in odds number of times, the results remains the same, so as to even number of times.
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