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I'm trying to generate all possible combinations for pair of 1's within given bit width.

Let's say the bit width is 6, i.e. number 32. This is what I would like to generate:

000000
000011
000110
001100
001111
011000
011011
011110
110000
110011
110110
111100
111111

If I have variables:

var a = 1,
    b = 2;
    num = a | b;

and create a loop that I'll loop over width - 1 times, and where I shift both a << 1 and b << 1, I'll get all combinations for one pair. After that, I'm pretty much stuck.

Could someone , please, provide some help.

Update: working example
Based on Barmar's mathematical approach, this is what I managed to implement

var arr = [],
    arrBits = [];

function getCombs(pairs, startIdx) {
    var i, j, val = 0, tmpVal, idx;

    if (startIdx + 2 < pairs) {
        startIdx = arr.length - 1;
        pairs -= 1;
    }

    if (pairs < 2) {
        return;
    }

    for (i = 0; i < pairs-1; i++) {
        idx = startIdx - (i * 2);
        val += arr[idx];

    }

    for (j = 0; j < idx - 1; j++) {
        arrBits.push((val + arr[j]).toString(2));
    }

    getCombs(pairs, startIdx-1);
}

(function initArr(bits) {
    var i, val, pairs, startIdx;

    for (i = 1; i < bits; i++) {
        val = i == 1 ? 3 : val * 2;
        arr.push(val);
        arrBits.push(val.toString(2));
    }

    pairs = Math.floor(bits / 2);
    startIdx = arr.length - 1;

    getCombs(pairs, startIdx);
    console.log(arrBits);

}(9));

Working example on JSFiddle
http://jsfiddle.net/zywc5/

share|improve this question
    
Your combination list is missing a lot of combinations. Like 000001. In fact, if you want all combination of 0 and 1 and width 6, you should have 64 possible combinations. Is your list a sample only or there's something else that you are not saying? –  lolol Sep 5 '12 at 20:46
    
1 doesn't have a pair of 1's. Based on his example, he's looking for all bit sequences that contain an even number of pairs of adjacent 1's. –  Barmar Sep 5 '12 at 20:47
    
As I stated on my question I wanted only all possible combinations for pair of 1's... so single 1's hanging there somewhere are not allowed –  micadelli Sep 5 '12 at 20:48
    
Do you have to do it using bitwise operators? There's a simple algebraic solution. –  Barmar Sep 5 '12 at 20:48
    
@Barmar if there's a mathematical solution for this, I'm all ears... I guess it will actually suit me better than bits. I didn't see any relation what it comes to those numbers. –  micadelli Sep 5 '12 at 20:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The numbers with exactly one pair of 1's are the sequence 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, ...; they start with 3 and just double each time.

The numbers with two pairs of 1's are 12+3, 24+3, 24+6, 48+3, 48+6, 48+12, ...; these are the above sequence starting at 12 + the original sequence up to n/4.

The numbers with three pairs of 1's are 48+12+3, 96+12+3, 96+24+3, 96+24+6, ...

The relationship between each of these suggests a recursive algorithm making use of the original doubling sequence. I don't have time right now to write it, but I think this should get you going.

share|improve this answer
    
Edit! I think I got it now. My grey cells are slow on these kind of mathematical problems. –  micadelli Sep 5 '12 at 21:03

if the bit width isn't that big then you'll be way better off creating bit representations for all numbers from 0 to 31 in a loop and simply ignore the ones that have an odd number of "ones" in the bit representation.

share|improve this answer
    
How should I validate the number doesn't have a single 1? –  micadelli Sep 5 '12 at 20:52
    
This isn't a list of all numbers with even hamming weight though - for example 101 isn't in it. –  harold Sep 5 '12 at 20:55

Maybe start counting normally in binary and replace all 1's with 11's like this:

n = 5
n = n.toString(2)          //= "101"
n = n.replace(/1/g, "11")  //= "11011"
n = parseInt(n, 2)         //= 27

So you'll get:

0   -> 0
1   -> 11
10  -> 110
11  -> 1111
100 -> 1100
101 -> 11011
110 -> 11110
111 -> 111111

And so on. You'll have to count up to 31 or so on the left side, and reject ones longer than 6 bits on the right side.

share|improve this answer

See http://jsfiddle.net/SBH6R/

var len=6,
    arr=[''];
for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
    for(var j=0;j<arr.length;j++){
        var k=j;
        if(getNum1(arr[j])%2===1){
            arr[j]+=1;
        }else{
            if(i<len-1){
                arr.splice(j+1,0,arr[j]+1);
                j++;
            }
            arr[k]+=0;
        }      
    }
}
function getNum1(str){
    var n=0;
    for(var i=str.length-1;i>=0;i--){
        if(str.substr(i,1)==='1'){n++;}
        else{break;}
    }
    return n;
}
document.write(arr.join('<br />'));

Or maybe you will prefer http://jsfiddle.net/SBH6R/1/. It's simpler, but then you will have to sort() the array:

var len=6,
    arr=[''];
for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
    for(var k=0,l=arr.length;k<l;k++){
        if(getNum1(arr[k])%2===1){
            arr[k]+=1;
        }else{
            if(i<len-1){
                arr.push(arr[k]+1);
            }
            arr[k]+=0;
        }     
    }
}
function getNum1(str){
    var n=0;
    for(var i=str.length-1;i>=0;i--){
        if(str.substr(i,1)==='1'){n++;}
        else{break;}
    }
    return n;
}
document.write(arr.sort().join('<br />'));

See http://jsperf.com/generate-all-combinations-for-pair-of-bits-set-to-1 if you want to compare the performance. It seems that the fastest code is the first one on Chrome but the second one on Firefox.

share|improve this answer

You can also do this with bit twiddling. If the lowest two bits are zero, we need to set them, which is equivalent to adding 3. Otherwise, we need to replace the lowest block of ones by its top bit and a 1-bit to the left of it. This can be done as follows, where x is the current combination:

x3 = x + 3;
return (((x ^ x3) - 2) >> 2) + x3;
share|improve this answer

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