Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I try to prevent a form submitting, with the following script, but it always does. I have even tried preventDefault() on document load, but it does not work.

$("form").submit(function() {
      if ($("input").eq(3).val() == $("input").eq(4).val()) {
            $("span").text("Validated...").show();
        return true;
      }

      $("span").text("Passwords do not match!").show().fadeOut(1000);
      return false;
});
share|improve this question
    
return true will cause the form to submit. Your code looks fine. –  Kevin B Sep 5 '12 at 20:50
    
@KevinB I know right? But it does not work! Maybe something's wrong with my server/browser(Chrome). –  MayTheSchwartzBeWithYou Sep 5 '12 at 21:01
    
For debugging, return false in both cases and alert or console.log at each to know which one was reached. More than likely your if statement conditional isn't selecting the correct input elements. –  Kevin B Sep 5 '12 at 21:08

3 Answers 3

$("form").submit(function(e) {
      if ($("input").eq(3).val() == $("input").eq(4).val()) {
            $("span").text("Validated...").show();
      }
      else{
        $("span").text("Passwords do not match!").show().fadeOut(1000);
        e.preventDefault();
      }
});

You need to use preventDefault() to cancel the action. Note the parameter e that I added to the anonymous function call.

share|improve this answer
    
It still submits. Weird things... Also can you elaborate what the 'e' stands for? –  MayTheSchwartzBeWithYou Sep 5 '12 at 20:50
    
return false from a jQuery event handler already does preventDefault() for you. This doesn't change the submit behavior from OP's code. –  jfriend00 Sep 5 '12 at 20:51
1  
@Peter Your validation logic must be evaluating to true then, so it's never getting to the preventDefault() line. e is just shorthand for event. You can name it whatever you want, but it is the event object that contains a number of properties related to the event. –  Shmiddty Sep 5 '12 at 20:53

My suggestion, or the way I normally go about this is like this:

$("form").submit(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault(); // form never fires unless I want it to

    if( condition == true ) {
        $(this).submit();
    } else {
        //Don't submit
    }
}

Here is a great explanation of why preventDefault() > return false

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In order for this to close I think I have found something, but it's absurd at best. My functions work when they are in a $(document).ready. Why? I would be glad to listen to your advice.

$(document).ready(function(){

$("form").submit(function() {
      if ($("input").eq(3).val() == $("input").eq(4).val()) {
            $("span").text("Validated...").show();
        return true;
      }

      $("span").text("Passwords do not match!").show().fadeOut(1000);
      return false;
});

 });
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.