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In the Entity Framework you can run and bind custom queries on-the-fly like so...

protected class NitrogenMoisutreContainer
{
    public double MinN { get; set; }
    public double MaxN { get; set; }
    public double MinM { get; set; }
    public double MaxM { get; set; }
}

// ...

var q = dbcontext.Database.SqlQuery<NitrogenMoisutreContainer>(@"SELECT MAX(NitrogenBalance) as MaxN, MIN(NitrogenBalance) as MinN, MAX(FCWaterPercent) as MaxM, MIN(FCWaterPercent) as MinM
                                                                    FROM agZoneProjectionGrowthStages
                                                                    WHERE NitrogenBalance > 0 AND FCWaterPercent > 0").First();

The problem is that, to me, this feels messy. I had to create this class for one query and I will never use it again for anything else. The results are used exactly one line down from where it is executed.

Is there a way I can return an anonymous type? Even if I had to declare it first, like this...

var anonItem = new {
    MinN = 0d,
    MaxN = 0d,
    MinM = 0d,
    MaxM = 0d
};

var q = dbcontext.Database.SqlQuery<anonItem.GetType()>("...");

I just can't figure out how to pass in my anonymous type's Type as T. Is it possible?

share|improve this question
    
I don't think this is possible as generics are determined at compile time. –  Matthew Sep 5 '12 at 20:49
    
@Matthew It's possible, although it'd be hacky. As to whether there's a good approach, that I don't know. –  Servy Sep 5 '12 at 20:50
    
Wow, that was fast. –  Matthew Sep 5 '12 at 20:50
    
@Matthew And the answer posted was even the one that I was debating posting myself. Now we're both freaked out. –  Servy Sep 5 '12 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that, to me, this feels messy. I had to create this class for one query and I will never use it again for anything else. The results are used exactly one line down from where it is executed.

I don't see this as a problem.

Is there a way I can return an anonymous type?

You could create a tuple instead.

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Any suggestions for best practices on where these one-off sort of proxy classes should be stored? I hate just having them dangling around. –  jocull Sep 6 '12 at 2:30
2  
@jocull: I usually just create them as private inner classes to restrict the accessibility and communicate the intentionally limited applicability. // Depending on your coding style, you could declare them near the method where they are used, at the end of the file, or even grouped together within their own #region. –  Jim G. Sep 6 '12 at 2:40

This can be done if you set it up so the type can be inferred. E.g.

public static IEnumerable<T> GetObjects<T>(T exampleItem, string sqlQuery) { ... }
var q = GetObjects(anonItem, @"");

I think this is a bit hackish, and I'd suggest trying another approach, like actually making the named class or using a tuple.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm with you on that... having the method to force the compiler to deal with it does feel a bit hackish. –  jocull Sep 5 '12 at 21:02
2  
I think that tuples are a no-go. The result type 'System.Tuple`4[System.Double,System.Double,System.Double,System.Double]' may not be abstract and must include a default constructor. –  jocull Sep 6 '12 at 2:15
    
You'll actually get similar errors with an anon type by inference too... The result type '<>f__AnonymousType7`4[System.Double,System.Double,System.Double,System.Double]' may not be abstract and must include a default constructor. Any suggestions for best practices on where these one-off sort of proxy classes should be stored? I hate just having them dangling around. –  jocull Sep 6 '12 at 2:29

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