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So, I have the following object (simplified for sake of example):

public class SomeListener implements EventListener{
    public final Object lock = new Object();
    public int receivedVal;

    @Override
    public onDataAvailable(int val){
        synchronized(lock){
            System.out.println("listener received val: " + val);
            receivedVal = val;
            lock.notifyAll();
        }
    }
}

And I have this piece of code somewhere in the main thread (again, simplified):

SomeListener listener = new SomeListener();
EventGenerator generatorThread = new EventGenerator();
generatorThread.addListener(listener);
synchronize(listener.lock){
    generatorThread.start();
    listener.lock.wait();
    System.out.println("value is: " + listener.receivedVal);
}
//some other stuff here....

Now, the EventGenerator object calls "onDataAvailable" with val = 1, then with val = 2 on a different thread. Basically, what I expect to see is:

listener received val: 1
value is: 1
listener received val: 2

However, I usually get:

listener received val: 1
listener received val: 2
value is: 2

It is as if the second call of "onDataAvailable" acquires the lock before the main thread is awaken. A simple println or a short sleep after the synchronized block of "onDataAvailable" is enough to get the expected result, but that seems like an ugly patch.

What am I doing wrong here?

Note, I do not have control on the thread that calls the listener. It's basically a thread that receives events over the network. Sometimes it will receive multiple events in the same message and will therefore call "onDataAvailable" multiple times one after the other, which leads to my problem. Other times it will receive two events in two different messages, which leaves enough time for the main thread to awake between the events.

share|improve this question
    
Look at the results you are getting and look at the documentation of notifyAll and wait. You'll see both of those functions are acting as described and nothing in your code prevents this from happening. Any ordering you don't prevent can happen, and in the real world, the most evil such ordering will happen. If you don't want this to happen, you have to prevent it somehow. (Perhaps have the signaling go in both directions.) –  David Schwartz Sep 5 '12 at 21:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It is as if the second call of "onDataAvailable" acquires the lock before the main thread is awaken

This is to be expected if you have multiple threads calling onDataAvailable(...). When notifyAll() is called, all of the threads that are waiting on that object are moved to the blocked queue but behind any threads already in the queue. They all have to wait to synchronize on the lock before continuing.

Other times it will receive two events in two different messages, which leaves enough time for the main thread to awake between the events.

Right, so multiple network handler threads are calling onDataAvailable(...). The 2nd one is blocked on the synchronized(lock) waiting for it. When notifyAll() is called, the other thread goes into the block queue as well but behind the other handler.

I would be surprised that you are getting that output if there is only one handler thread. In that case, the notified thread should get the synchronize lock before the single thread handler can unlock, read another message, and lock again.

What am I doing wrong here?

The problem is not with the way the threads are being handled but by the way you are handling the receivedVal. You should process the value immediately in the handling thread or you will need to put it in some sort of synchronized queue (maybe a LinkedBlockingQueue) to be printed out by the main thread in order.

If you use a BlockingQueue then the main queue just does a queue.take() which causes it to wait for a result and the handler threads just do a queue.put(...). You would not need to do the wait() or notifyAll() calls yourself.

Something like this would work:

private final BlockingQueue<Integer> queue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<Integer>();
...

@Override
public onDataAvailable(int val){
    System.out.println("listener received val: " + val);
    queue.put(val);
}
...

generatorThread.addListener(listener);
generatorThread.start();
while (true) {
    // this waits for the queue to get a value
    int val = queue.take();
    System.out.println("value is: " + val);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought it was a case of multiple threads calling onDataAvailable (I don't really know how the network handler is implemented), but if that was the case, I don't see why the sleep/println in the "onDataAvailable" implementation would change anything. That said, I'll see if I can handle the receivedVal better. –  PhilBel Sep 5 '12 at 21:07
    
Not sure @Phil. I guess it depends on where the sleep was. You also had the problem of the receivedVal being shared between two threads without being synchronized or marked volatile. –  Gray Sep 5 '12 at 21:11
    
The sleep was right after the synchronized block. Also, I'm not sure about the last part. All accesses to receivedVal are done in synchronized blocks. Or did you mean that nothing insures that accesses will be synchronized? You are right, I should mark it volatile. –  PhilBel Sep 6 '12 at 13:43
    
Whoops, you are right. You don't need to make it volatile if you are in synchronized blocks. That doesn't remove the race condition however. –  Gray Sep 6 '12 at 13:49

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