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Is there any way to get the xml encoding in the toString() Function?

Example:

xml.Save("myfile.xml");

leads to

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Cooperations>
  <Cooperation>
    <CooperationId>xxx</CooperationId>
    <CooperationName>Allianz Konzern</CooperationName>
    <LogicalCustomers>

But

tb_output.Text = xml.toString();

leads to an output like this

<Cooperations>
  <Cooperation>
    <CooperationId>xxx</CooperationId>
    <CooperationName>Allianz Konzern</CooperationName>
    <LogicalCustomers>
    ...
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4 Answers 4

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Either explicitly write out the declaration, or use a StringWriter and call Save():

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml.Linq;

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string xml = @"<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
<Cooperations>
  <Cooperation />
</Cooperations>";

        XDocument doc = XDocument.Parse(xml);
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        using (TextWriter writer = new StringWriter(builder))
        {
            doc.Save(writer);
        }
        Console.WriteLine(builder);
    }

You could easily add that as an extension method:

public static string ToStringWithDeclaration(this XDocument doc)
{
    if (doc == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("doc");
    }
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    using (TextWriter writer = new StringWriter(builder))
    {
        doc.Save(writer);
    }
    return builder.ToString();
}

This has the advantage that it won't go bang if there isn't a declaration :)

Then you can use:

string x = doc.ToStringWithDeclaration();
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11  
This has a small issue in that the encoding in the XDocument declaration is ignored and replaced by the encoding of the StringWriter when doing the save, which may or may not be what you want –  Sam Holder Oct 13 '10 at 11:25
2  
Then you combine the extension method with: Utf8StringWriter from stackoverflow.com/a/1564727/75963 ;) –  Nick Josevski Sep 6 '12 at 14:31
8  
Found it easier to use the extension method above but return the following... return doc.Declaration + doc.ToString(); If the Declaration is null, it just results in an empty string. –  EC182 Dec 6 '12 at 17:17

The Declaration property will contain the XML declaration. To get the contents plus declaration, you can do the following:

tb_output.Text = xml.Declaration.ToString() + xml.ToString()
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4  
it seems if you don't use new XDeclaration("1.0", "utf-8", "yes") in your xdocument this creates an error because xml.Declaration is null. But xml.save seems to autodetect the right encoding. –  Henrik P. Hessel Aug 4 '09 at 18:02

use this:

output.Text = String.Concat(xml.Declaration.ToString() , xml.ToString())
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You can also use an XmlWriter and call the

Writer.WriteDocType() 

method.

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