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The best way (IMO):

  test.add("Expect job not to be done.", function(expect){
       expect(job.done).toBe(false);
  })

This question has been updated and I post here how I've ended doing the tests if someone might need it.

Original question below...

I know it might not even be possible but I will clearly explain why and how I want it to work:

Why?

I want to make some tests that doesn't fail when something is missing and I wouldn't want to test everything if exists or not.

Example:

expect('Something', existingClosureVar.notExistingProperty.toString()).toBe('ho ho');

This will throw an error like this: TypeError: Cannot call method 'toString' of undefined.

To work around this is quite easy, but also a pain!

if(existingClosureVar && existingClosureVar.notExistingProperty && existingClosureVar.notExistingProperty.toString){
     expect('Something', existingClosureVar.notExistingProperty.toString()).toBe('ho ho');
}

Well, but if it doesn't exist I'm not even noticed about the failing test! Maybe some more detailed workaround might exists but would make this code bigger and bigger, when all I want is a simple thing, which should be the shortest thing possible.

How should work instead?

expect('Something', 'existingClosureVar.notExistingProperty.toString()').toBe('ho ho');

Somehow the expect function should have access to the variable local to the closure in order to make this work. It will run the string in a try-catch context and if fails something will be failing the test too.

Exact thing I want:

var callingFn = function(){
    var a = 99;
    // remember, the eval can't sit here, must be outside
    var evalString = 'console.log(a)'; // should print 99
    expect(this, evalString); // 
}
var expect = function(context, evalString){
        var fn = function(){
                eval(evalString)
        }
        fn.call(context);

}
new callingFn(); // creates a this in the callingFn that is not the window object

It works if I supply a context, but...

that would require me to use the "this." notation to get a variable. As a lot of functions are async and the context of the functions is not maintained (could be maintained, but more work is needed) (or we could use a closure variable to keep the context variables).

Example:

var callingFn = function(){
    var context = {b: 1};
    var evalString = 'b'; // prints 1
    expect(context, evalString)
}
var expect = function(context, evalString){
        var fn = function(){
                console.log(eval('this.' + evalString))
        }
        fn.call(context);

}
callingFn()​

One ugly solution I found:

var callingFn = function(){
    // setup the context
    var context = {};
    // give access to the local closure
    context.fn = function(evalString){
        console.log(eval(evalString))
    }
    var a = 99;
    var evalString = 'a'; // should print 99
    expect(context, evalString);
}
var expect = function(context, evalString){
    context.fn(evalString);
}
callingFn()​

Workable solution but still too much verbose:

And also I must put 4 lines before the code, but here it is Click here to open the Fiddle example:

    var callingFn = function(expect){
    // give access to the local closure
    expect.fn = function(evalString){
        try      {return [undefined, eval(evalString)];
        }catch(e){return [e, undefined];}
    }


    var a = {hey: 1, b: {c: 99}};
    console.log(expect('a.b.c', 99)); // true
    console.log(expect('a.b.c.d.f', 99)); // return the error
    console.log(expect('a.b.c', 44)); // false
    console.log(expect('a.hey', 1)); // true
}
var expect = function(evalString, target){
    var result = expect.fn(evalString);
    var err = result[0];
    var output = result[1];
    if(err){
        return err.stack;
    }else{
        return output === target;
    }
}
callingFn(expect)​

Shared context:

Fiddle link

var callingFn = function(expect){
    // give access to the local closure
    var context = {};
    expect.context = context;
    context.a = {hey: 1, b: {c: 99}};
    console.log(expect('a.b.c', 99)); // true
    console.log(expect('a.b.c.d.f', 99)); // return the error
    console.log(expect('a.b.c', 44)); // false
    console.log(expect('a.hey', 1)); // true
}
var expect = function(evalString, target){
    var fn = function(evalString){
        try      {return [undefined, eval('this.' + evalString)];
        }catch(e){return [e, undefined];}
    }
    var result = fn.call(expect.context, evalString);
    var err = result[0];
    var output = result[1];
    if(err){
        return err.stack;
    }else{
        return output === target;
    }
}
callingFn(expect)​

Local var + string:

Fiddle link

var callingFn = function(expect){
    // give access to the local closure
    var a = {hey: 1, b: {c: 99}};
    console.log(expect(a, '.b.c', 99)); // true
    console.log(expect(a, '.b.c.d.f', 99)); // return the error
    console.log(expect(a, '.b.c', 44)); // false
    console.log(expect(a, '.hey', 1)); // true
}
var expect = function(object, evalString, target){
    var fn = function(evalString){
        try      {return [undefined, eval('object' + evalString)];
        }catch(e){return [e, undefined];}
    }
    var result = fn(evalString);
    var err = result[0];
    var output = result[1];
    if(err){
        return err.stack;
    }else{
        return output === target;
    }
}
callingFn(expect)​

// examples are for Google Chrome, it might not work in other browsers.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In a word, no. You simply cannot access a variable in a closure from eval code.

Functions created with eval or the Function constructor always run in the global scope (or in strict mode, undefined scope). There is no way to avoid this.

Furthermore, you cannot access a function's scope from outside the function (or a function inside of that function). This is because JavaScript has static scope; scope is fixed at the time of declaration. A function cannot change its scope chain.

If you just want your test to fail if a property is undefined, the simplest way might be:

if (obj && obj.prop) expect('Some Test', obj.prop) ...
else fail('Some Test');

Or use a callback whose invocation is wrapped in a try.

expect('Some Test', function() {
    return obj.prop;
}).toBe('some value');

expect can use the callback's return value, or allow you to pass a simple value if you know that the identifier in question will always be defined.

function expect(name, o) {
    var expectedValue;
    if (typeof o == 'function') {
        try { expectedValue = o(); }
        catch(ex) { /* fail here */ }
    } else expectedValue = o;

    ...
}

So you can call expect either way:

function callingFn() {
    var localVar = 1, someObj = {};

    expect('Test var', localVar).toBe(1);
    expect('Test obj', function() { return someObj.missingProp.toString(); }).toBe('value');
}
share|improve this answer
    
yet using the "if(obj && obj.prop)" or the "try{function}catch(){}" is still to verbose IMO. That's why I choose to ask for the least verbose way to do this. And thanks for your response ;) –  Totty.js Sep 5 '12 at 22:06
    
The diference between this "expect('Test obj', function() { return someObj.missingProp.toString(); }).toBe('value');" and "expect('Test obj', 'someObj.missingProp.toString()').toBe('value');" is not so big, I know, but I wouldn't like to see a function everywhere in each expect call. –  Totty.js Sep 5 '12 at 22:08
    
Quite frankly, I don't think you're going to get much better than what you see in my final example. Given that scope is static and eval always runs in the global scope, it simply isn't possible to accomplish your goals without a function definition inside the scope of your target variable. Besides, this is JavaScript; there's no need to fear anonymous callback functions. –  josh3736 Sep 5 '12 at 22:12
    
I don't fear, I just wanted to know if it was possible to make some more cleaner tests. Using a function for each expect variable is a little bit too much.. :s –  Totty.js Sep 5 '12 at 22:14
    
Eh - it's 18 extra characters. IMO, it's much less intrusive than any of the alternatives in your question. –  josh3736 Sep 5 '12 at 22:20

No, eval'd code runs in the global scope. Why do you need to use eval again?

Use an anonymous function instead instead of putting the code in a string and all your problems related to the scope will go away.

var callingFn = function() {
    var a = 99;
    // remember, the eval can't sit here, must be outside
    expect(this, function() {
        console.log(a);
    });
}
var expect = function(context, callable) {
    try {
        callable.call(context);
    }
    catch(ex) {
        // handle exception
    }
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ThiefMaster/P5VCR/

share|improve this answer
    
this is a great idea too, but I would really love to not having to define a new function for each expect if possible, as this is the reason of the question I've made. I target to use the less possible code and the cleaner code possible, even if I have to use eval.. But thanks for your answer. –  Totty.js Sep 5 '12 at 22:03
    
This is how to do it. You cannot write clean code using eval. Especially not when you need access to the local scope where the code string is being defined. –  ThiefMaster Sep 5 '12 at 22:21

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