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I know that function arguments are padded to target word size, but with what?

Specifically in the context of the x86 Linux GNU toolchain, what do these functions return?

int iMysteryMeat(short x)
{
    return *((int *)&x);
}
unsigned uMysteryMeat(unsigned short x)
{
    return *((unsigned *)&x);
}

The question is whether, when hand-coding a function in assembly, it is necessary to sterilze "small" arguments by masking or sign-extending them before using them in "large" contexts (andl, imull).

I'd also be interested whether there are any more general or cross-platform standards for this case.

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1  
Use gcc -S and then come back and tell us! –  Alex Brown Sep 5 '12 at 22:14
2  
your question has nothing to do with ELFs –  TJD Sep 5 '12 at 22:34
    
You are correct. It was as much a joke as a shot in the dark. –  bug Sep 5 '12 at 22:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This depends on the ABI. The ABI needs to specify the choice that small arguments are extended by the caller, or by the callee (and how). Unfortunately, this part of the ABI is often underspecified, leading to different choices by different compilers. So to prevent incompatibility between code compiled with different legacy compilers, most modern compilers (I know in particular about gcc on i386) err on the side of caution and do both.

int a(short x) {
  return x;
}
int b(int x);
int c(short x) {
  b(x);
}

gcc -m32 -O3 -S tmp.c -o tmp.s

_a:
pushl   %ebp
movl    %esp, %ebp
movswl  8(%ebp),%eax
leave
ret

_c:
pushl   %ebp
movl    %esp, %ebp
movswl  8(%ebp),%eax
movl    %eax, 8(%ebp)
leave
jmp _b

Note that a does not assume any extension rule about its argument, but extends it itself. Similarly, c makes sure to extend its argument before passing it to b (via a tail call).

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Thank you for both the how and the why. I'm actually tutoring my classmates on systems, and this is plenty enough to explain it. –  bug Sep 5 '12 at 22:31

Although Keith's answer is in line with the spirit of my question, per Alex's request I thought I'd try this out for myself.

Interestingly, in this case the more literal answer to my example is "garbage".

#include <stdio.h>

int iMysteryMeat(short x)
{
    return *((int *)&x);
}
unsigned uMysteryMeat(unsigned short x)
{
    return *((unsigned *)&x);
}
int main()
{
    printf("iMeat: 0x%08x\n", iMysteryMeat(-23));
    printf("uMeat: 0x%08x\n", uMysteryMeat(-23));
    return 0;
}

gcc -m32 -S meat.c

iMysteryMeat:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    subl    $4, %esp
    movl    8(%ebp), %eax
    movw    %ax, -4(%ebp)
    leal    -4(%ebp), %eax
    movl    (%eax), %eax
    leave
    ret
uMysteryMeat:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    subl    $4, %esp
    movl    8(%ebp), %eax
    movw    %ax, -4(%ebp)
    leal    -4(%ebp), %eax
    movl    (%eax), %eax
    leave
    ret

./a.out
iMeat: 0x0804ffe9
uMeat: 0x0043ffe9

As you can see, not only is the usual sign-extension protocol overrided (i.e. compare with Keith's a()), it actually moves x into uninitialized stack space with movw, rendering the top half of the return value garbage no matter what main() gives it.

So, again, as ouah said, never ever do this in C, and in assembly (or in general, really), always sterilize your inputs.

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int iMysteryMeat(short x)
{
    return *((int *)&x);
}

This is undefined behavior in C, this violates aliasing rules and may also violate alignment requirements. In short don't do this.

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I am well aware that this is revolting C code and would never actually use it, but it intentionally exposes the ugliness underneath. I could give you my specific use case in assembly if you wanted. –  bug Sep 5 '12 at 22:19
    
Being undefined behavior means the C standard gives all latitude to the implementation to translate this and does not give any restriction. –  ouah Sep 5 '12 at 22:21
1  
Which is why I specified the object architechture and compiler I'm using. Portability is out the window. –  bug Sep 5 '12 at 22:22
    
Also, it doesn't do what OP thinks it does. There is no reason &x has to refer to the copy of the value that was passed on the stack. The compiler may choose to make a new copy in the callee's stack frame and use that copy as x. –  R.. Sep 6 '12 at 2:45
    
@R.. as I discovered in my own experiment, which I already posted as an answer –  bug Sep 7 '12 at 1:58

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