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How can i make a function to clear a C string and/or free the allocated memory? Why the following code does not work?

void freeStr(char** str) {
    free(*str);
}
int main() {
    char* str = "some string";
    freeStr(&str);
    printf("%s", str);
    return 0;
}
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7  
You can only use free() on pointers that you used malloc() before. –  Ondřej Čertík Sep 5 '12 at 22:58
1  
@groove that being said, the pointer value should be enough... no need for a pointer to a pointer. You can't safely modify the data of a string literal since its const char[], and you also shouldn't free it since you didn't malloc it... it's not even on the heap. –  oldrinb Sep 6 '12 at 0:10
    
Feel free to upvote and/or accept answers that you've found helpful. –  Chimera Sep 6 '12 at 0:35
    
@oldrinb You say, I should use free(str) instead of free(*str) in function freeStr(), right? –  groove Sep 6 '12 at 6:15

5 Answers 5

You can neither free nor clear the memory of the array that a string literal denotes.

However, to lose access to it, all you need is to change the pointer you've stored its address in:

str = NULL; // in main
// or
*str = NULL; // in freeStr
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The string you allocated is in the CONST_DATA section (cannot be modified) and hence, you cannot call free on it.

That part of memory is allocated at compile time and is read only. That part of memory still holds "some string\0"

The CONST_DATA section, in assembly is like the data-segment (DS), which contains global and static (read-only) variables initialized at compile time itself. They do not change during runtime, and remain allocated to the running program.

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2  
Um, your last paragraph is wrong. Programs don't overwrite other programs memory. Besides, the OP doesn't actually free memory. –  Park Young-Bae Sep 5 '12 at 23:04
1  
@Cicada he says "Could". I agree with him that any physical address range deallocated could be given to other programs by an OS. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 5 '12 at 23:10
1  
Yes, but it would no longer be mapped into your address space, and cannot be read or written. –  Puppy Sep 5 '12 at 23:13
1  
It could be read still, as long as the user has a pointer to it. Writing to it wouldn't have worked, as it was in the CONST_DATA section anyway. –  DarkCthulhu Sep 5 '12 at 23:16
    
@DarkCthulhu, That part of memory is allocated at compile time and is read only. Can you please elaborate it, which will help me to understand more on the memory allocation at compile time? As per my understanding, at compile time we will just create some virtual address and bind variables to this virtual address (stack memory?), we will get original memory at run time of a program? So where is this read only memory, under which section of memory layout this `read only memory variable’ goes? Please explain. –  sree Apr 21 at 11:44

The answers are pretty good, but there are a few points that they've missed or omitted. Your question is also slightly vague.

If you want to clear a C string you overwrite the memory space that it points to with null bytes. You can only free() a C string that has been allocated by the heap allocator via a call to one of the heap allocator functions such as malloc(), calloc() or realloc() etc.

So if you allocated a string using malloc(), or one of the other heap allocation functions, like so and then copied a string into it, you could clear it by calling memset(), but you would still then have to call free() to release that memory back to the heap.

For example:

char* strPtr = malloc(32); // allocate 32 bytes of storage off the heap
strcpy(strPtr, "test");    // copy a string into the newly allocated block on the heap
memset(strPtr, 0, 32);     // clear the allocated block
free(strPtr);              // return the allocated block to the heap

Also, note that C uses block scope and you do not have to explicitly deallocate arrays which were declared with the default storage class, auto, as they are popped off of the stack frame when that block goes out of scope.

void foo() {
    char strArray[32];          // this is a stack allocation
    strcpy(strArray, "test");   // copy a string onto the stack
    return;                     // no call to free() required
}

Finally, yet another method of allocation is static. When you use the declaration:

char* str = "literal string";

The space for the string "literal string" resides in a statically allocated segment which should never be written to. On some platforms, you will get a segfault if you try to write to that memory segment. You should not attempt to clear memory blocks that were statically allocated as there is no guarantee that the segment which they are mapped into is writable.

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Do I have to use memset() before free()? Does using free() without memset() cause a memory leak? –  groove Sep 6 '12 at 7:04
1  
no, you do not. memset() just overwrites the contents of the buffer with null bytes. the only input that the heap allocator needs to do release that block of memory back into the heap is the address. note also that the allocator does not automatically zero the buffer before returning a pointer to your code. this eventuality produces all kinds of interesting behavior :). –  Max DeLiso Sep 6 '12 at 20:47

You might find it helpful to go over the C FAQ - malloc section.

As others have noted, you can't free or modify string literals as they are usually placed in read only sections of memory. However, if you wish to clear and free() dynamically allocated memory, you'd do something like the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define LENGTH  20

void freeStr(char **str)
{
    free( *str );
    *str = NULL;   
}

int main() {

    char *str = malloc( sizeof(char) * LENGTH);

    // clear that allocated memory
    memset( str, 0x00, LENGTH );

    // Put some text into the memory
    strncpy( str, "Some text", LENGTH-1 );

    printf("Before: %s\n", str);


    freeStr(&str);
    // string is now NULL and the memory is free.
    printf("After: %s\n", str);

    return 0;
}
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Is using memset() a must here? (I am confused because we put some text into the memory just after clearing it). –  groove Sep 6 '12 at 7:08
1  
Not needed. I put it there just to show how to clear the allocated memory. –  Chimera Sep 6 '12 at 15:16
    
@Chimera, why do you need to use *str = NULL;? why using free( *str ); alone is not clearing the memory(since we are deallocating the memory)? Why we are able to get the string memory contents which is already freed or deleted? Can you please explain in detail? –  sree Apr 21 at 13:14

http://en.cppreference.com/w/c/memory/free

void free( void* ptr );

Deallocates the space previously allocated by malloc(), calloc() or realloc(). If ptr is null-pointer, the function does nothing.

Your string is not allocated with any of these functions. I think is this way.

void freeStr(char **str) {
    *str = NULL;
}
int main() {
    char* str = (char *)"some string";
    printf("Before: %s\n", str);
    freeStr(&str);
    printf("After: %s\n", str);
    return 0;
}
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1  
That actually does nothing to the original pointer. The pointer is passed by value. –  chris Sep 5 '12 at 23:03
4  
Don't do that ever again. –  Griwes Sep 5 '12 at 23:11
    
Forgot reference, thanx chris. Wow Griwes, thanx for that info, really. –  Jorge Fuentes González Sep 5 '12 at 23:16
1  
you cannot use delete if you didn't use new and you cannot use free if you didn't use malloc,calloc, realloc –  SSpoke Sep 5 '12 at 23:17
1  
That code is wrong. Notice the C tag. This is the correct code to NULL the pointer. pastebin.com/YxrP4SKZ –  Chimera Sep 5 '12 at 23:54

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