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I have a problem with initializing an array of double with the size determined in runtime.

MyPoly MyPoly::operator *(const MyPoly& other)
{
    int newDegree = this->_degree + other._degree;
    double array [newDegree] ;
    fillArrayWithZeros(array, this->_degree + other._degree);

    PolyRep::iterator it1 = this->_poly->begin();
    PolyRep::iterator it2 = other._poly->begin();

    for (int i = 0; i <= this->_degree; ++i, ++it1)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j <= other._degree; ++j, ++it2)
        {
            array[i + j] += (*it1) * (*it2);
        }
        it2 = other._poly->begin();
    }
    return MyPoly(array, this->_degree + other._degree);
}

It's in the second line of the function. If ill put a number say - 10 it works just fine. There is no compilation error and no runtime error, but when i debug the program i see the array is empty.

The thing is that in the following function the initialization works fine although the size of the array is being determined in runtime as well :

MyPoly MyPoly::operator +(const MyPoly& other)
{
    int bigDegree = (this->_poly->getDegree() > other._poly->getDegree()) ?
            this->_poly->getDegree() : other._poly->getDegree();

    double arr [bigDegree];

    PolyRep::iterator it1 = this->_poly->begin();
    PolyRep::iterator it2 = other._poly->begin();

    for (int i = 0; i <= this->_poly->getDegree(); ++i, ++it1)
    {
        arr[i] = *it1;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i <= other._poly->getDegree(); ++i, ++it2)
    {
        arr[i] += *it2;
    }

    return MyPoly(arr, bigDegree + 1);
}

Both function are in the same class.

Can someone explain what is the problem

share|improve this question
2  
C++ doesn't include variable-length arrays. I recommend using std::vector instead. If fillArrayWithZeros does what I think it does, it can also be replaced with std::fill, or you can rely on the vector to default-initialize the elements. –  chris Sep 5 '12 at 23:13
    
@chris Although this requires for me to build another constructor this seems to be the perfect solution. Thanks man you rock! –  oopsi Sep 5 '12 at 23:27
    
What exactly is the problem? How do you determine that an array hasn't been initialized? (BTW, C++ does not include arrays that have runtime-determined sizes, so this is an implementation extension and thus an implementation related issue). –  eq- Sep 5 '12 at 23:27
    
I debugged the program i can see it in the variables scope. –  oopsi Sep 5 '12 at 23:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In both codes, you are writing off the end of the array, which can cause arbitrarily bad behavior. You need to use < instead of <= in your loops, or allocate 2 extra slots.

To answer your question, you are otherwise using runtime-sized arrays correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
@oopsi: You're writing off the end of the array. This can cause very bad things to happen, like erasing your stack frame, overwriting your arguments with junk, etc. It may very well be causing the behavior you see. –  Keith Randall Sep 5 '12 at 23:28
    
I'm red with shame... You were right my friend! They don't call me oopsi for nothing. Thanks!!! –  oopsi Sep 5 '12 at 23:33
2  
You can't use runtime-sized arrays correctly in C++, since the language doesn't support them. (Unless you're using an implementation-defined extension.) –  Keith Thompson Sep 5 '12 at 23:34
    
@KeithThompson: true, but it's pretty clear from the question that he is using such an implementation-defined extension. –  Keith Randall Sep 5 '12 at 23:35
2  
I think although this fixed my problem ill change it to a vector. Seems like the smarter way to go. –  oopsi Sep 5 '12 at 23:38

In one code, you're using ->_degree and in the other you're using ->getDegree(). Are those really the same thing?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes is a result of bad design. I added the degree field later in the design i still need to fix that. –  oopsi Sep 5 '12 at 23:34

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