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struct file_operations memory_fops = {
  read: memory_read,
  write: memory_write,
  open: memory_open,
  release: memory_release
};

what does ":" in this code snippet mean? thank you. This is from linux driver code. the more complete code is here:

/* Necessary includes for device drivers */
#include <linux/init.h>
#include <linux/config.h>
#include <linux/module.h>
#include <linux/kernel.h> /* printk() */
#include <linux/slab.h> /* kmalloc() */
#include <linux/fs.h> /* everything... */
#include <linux/errno.h> /* error codes */
#include <linux/types.h> /* size_t */
#include <linux/proc_fs.h>
#include <linux/fcntl.h> /* O_ACCMODE */
#include <asm/system.h> /* cli(), *_flags */
#include <asm/uaccess.h> /* copy_from/to_user */

MODULE_LICENSE("Dual BSD/GPL");

/* Declaration of memory.c functions */
int memory_open(struct inode *inode, struct file *filp);
int memory_release(struct inode *inode, struct file *filp);
ssize_t memory_read(struct file *filp, char *buf, size_t count, loff_t *f_pos);
ssize_t memory_write(struct file *filp, char *buf, size_t count, loff_t *f_pos);
void memory_exit(void);
int memory_init(void);

/* Structure that declares the usual file */
/* access functions */
struct file_operations memory_fops = {
  read: memory_read,
  write: memory_write,
  open: memory_open,
  release: memory_release
};

/* Declaration of the init and exit functions */
module_init(memory_init);
module_exit(memory_exit);

/* Global variables of the driver */
/* Major number */
int memory_major = 60;
/* Buffer to store data */
char *memory_buffer;
share|improve this question
    
@chris: That's an initializer, not a struct definition. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 5 '12 at 23:16
    
@KevinBallard, Yes, I just realized that. In other languages, you can use syntax sort of like that to initialize specific members via their name, but not in C++ (maybe C++/CLI has it, but that seems a bit unlikely). –  chris Sep 5 '12 at 23:18
2  
@chris: You can do that in C using { .field = value, .field2 = value2 } –  Kevin Ballard Sep 5 '12 at 23:18
    
It's the obsolete syntax for designated initializers. –  harold Sep 5 '12 at 23:18
    
@KevinBallard, Interesting. I haven't used enough C to know you could do it there I guess. –  chris Sep 5 '12 at 23:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's a Gnu C extension. Basically it allows to specify elements in the initializer in any order.

http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Designated-Inits.html

UPD: The standard (C99) way to do the same is { .field = value, .field2 = value2 }

share|improve this answer
    
Huh, I never knew field: value was an alternative syntax for this. Apparently it's been obsolete for a long time. –  Kevin Ballard Sep 5 '12 at 23:20
    
thanks. Got it. –  Anders Lind Sep 5 '12 at 23:20
4  
Your answer should also mention the C99 syntax for designated initializers. –  Keith Thompson Sep 5 '12 at 23:35

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